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Is logicalising a valid word, if the meaning was to make something supposedly 'illogical', logical?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, Dan Bron, Mitch, choster, ab2 Oct 4 '17 at 20:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions on choosing an ideal word or phrase must include information on how it will be used in order to be answered. For help writing a good word or phrase request, see: About single word requests" – Mitch, ab2
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  • I might prefer logicizing/logicising but perhaps that means something else – Henry Oct 2 '17 at 21:17
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"Logicalise" already exist as a word, and it already means something other than the definition you listed. It means "to reason, to think, to use or apply logic", without the connotation of trying to make something illogical into something logical. For example, see here:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/logicalizing

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/logicalize

http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/logicalize

The word you might be looking for is "rationalise" or its various synonyms.

rationalise: attempt to explain or justify [something] with logical, plausible reasons, even if these are not true or appropriate. (from ODO)

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'Logical' is an adjective which you have then verbalised. I would say 'logicate' is the correct verb from the noun, 'logic'.

And, since it is available in English, it is quite valid. I know of several books that have used 'logicate' within the past five years.

'Logicate' is similar to calculate, but 'calculate' is a matter of arithmetical logic whereas 'logicate' is the process which uses pure logic, rather than numbers.

  • ELU deals with accepted English usage. A few instances of the use of a candidate word may be nothing more than an error. There needs to be some authoritative endorsement of a usage to show that the candidate has actually been accepted into the lexis, and a reasonable answer on ELU would not lack evidence. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 2 '17 at 21:52
  • @ Edwin Ashworth I preferred not to quote the books (six of them) in which the word occurred because they are all authored by myself. The word is chosen deliberately to translate the Greek word λογιζομαι, logizomai, which has a large bearing on New Testament theology but had no suitable English equivalent, until now. – Nigel J Oct 2 '17 at 22:10
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    You can't confer wordness unilaterally. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 2 '17 at 22:56
  • @ Edwin Ashworth But language is not a static thing. It develops, in the hands of those who wish to develop it. – Nigel J Oct 2 '17 at 22:57
  • But neither is language a free-for-all. The NASB version renders 'λογιζομαι' consider (6), considered (2), counted (1), counting (1), credit (1), credited (9), credits (1), dwell (1), maintain (1), numbered (2), propose (1), reason (1), reckoned (2), regard (4), regarded (3), suppose (1), take into account (3), thinks. {BibleHub} And it's generally regarded as the most accurate. 'Develop' often becomes 'do your own thing', which can soon become 'obfuscate' or even 'promulgate untruth'. Before you came clean, ... – Edwin Ashworth Oct 2 '17 at 23:13

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