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For my English Language A level class I am analysing the song "The Story of O.J." by Jay-Z which frequently uses the word "nigga". Is there a term to define the word "nigger" (as in one that shows that is socially unacceptable to use it rather than just a 'noun') but is there a totally separate one if it is changed to "nigga"?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Davo, user66974, Janus Bahs Jacquet, Mitch, Scott Sep 29 '17 at 2:58

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    "Is there an A but is there a B?" – Edwin Ashworth Sep 28 '17 at 8:56
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    Not sure what you are asking about, anyway: Nigga is used mainly among African Americans, but also among other minorities and ethnicities, in a neutral or familiar way and as a friendly term of address. It is also common in rap music. However, nigga is taken to be extremely offensive when used by outsiders. Many people consider this word to be equally as offensive as nigger. The words nigger and nigga are pronounced alike in certain dialects, and so it has been claimed that they are one and the same word. dictionary.com/browse/nigga – user66974 Sep 28 '17 at 8:58
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Both versions of the word would known as a Racial Slur:

a derogatory or disrespectful nickname for a racial group, used without restraint

The usage of the word is highly debated in the United States as some members of the black community use the term freely among themselves with little to no backlash (an example being the song you mention).

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Try Pronunciation respelling

Wikipedia says:

A pronunciation respelling is a regular phonetic respelling of a word that does have a standard spelling, so as to indicate the pronunciation. Pronunciation respellings are sometimes seen in dictionaries.

This should not be confused with pronunciation spelling, which is an ad hoc spelling of a word that has no standard spelling. Most of these are nonce coinages, but some have become standardized, e.g. gonna to represent the pronunciation of going to, as in I'm gonna catch you.

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