0

In the last August edition of TIME Magazine, I stumbled across this sentence. I am not a native speaker and am interested whether the unusual structure without any comma is correct. I am also unsure about the meaning of the word impose in this context.

But there's a catch for the Trump team. If you want to be sure the near-term pain a trade battle would impose on U.S. workers will prove worthwhile in the long run, you'd better have allies — both political and military.

1
  • A trade battle would impose on US workers the near-term pain which will prove worthwhile in the long run. If you want to make sure this, you must have both political and military allies. Sep 15, 2017 at 3:10

1 Answer 1

-1

“the near-term pain a trade battle would impose on U.S. workers will prove worthwhile...”

Can be rewritten as “the pain that a trade battle would put on US workers will be worth it.”

1
  • 1
    Welcome to EL&U. Please provide support for your answer. I do not think "put on pain" (not a direct quote) is correct or idiomatic English. Oct 26, 2017 at 3:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.