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Is it common to say the following: (assuming that both sentences are "too long" to combine into one). Or are there better ways to say these things?

I prefer to go to work without my bags and to read a book on the train. This because it gives me a good feeling when I arrive at my work place...

or

Smart applications exploit the intertwinement of software, hardware, and network capabilities to exchange large amounts of information. This to optimize contemporary failures in a dedicated way...

  • The deletions here (of 'is', at least in the first example) don't work too well with these contexts (and arguably leave fragments rather than true sentences, but that's just terminology). In your first example, I think you can safely delete further and start at 'It'; I prefer the style now, consistently chatty. // I'm not clear about what is deleted in your second example; is the 'original' "This is done to" / "This serves to" / "The purpose of this information exchange is"? – Edwin Ashworth Sep 7 '17 at 9:41
  • I prefer going to my work without bags and reading books on the train, because it gives me a good feeling (when I arrive ) at the work place. – mahmud koya Sep 7 '17 at 10:48
  • @EdwinAshworth indeed, it could replace it by "this is because" in the first sentence and "this is done to" in the second sentence, but I'm wondering whether the "abbreviations" i did is common in the English language or isn't this done at all? – Captain Obvious Sep 8 '17 at 9:45
  • This particular deletion isn't, to my mind, common at all. It sounds almost highfalutin' to my ears, which is unusual for a deleted form. It is an example of be-deletion (at least, your first example is). "You OK?" is a far more idiomatic example, in a very informal register. This post on be-deletion is OK and John Lawler's, on conversational deletion is excellent. – Edwin Ashworth Sep 8 '17 at 11:03
  • Captain Obvious, could you first correct it could replace it by "this is because" in the first sentence and "this is done to" in the second sentence, but I'm wondering whether the "abbreviations" i did is common in the English language or isn't this done at all? That alone might give you an answer. Either way, did you notice whether the "abbreviations" i did is common in the English language or isn't this done at all isn’t a useful question? You’ve given two and only two choices for a question which in fact has almost limitless answers. – Robbie Goodwin Sep 8 '17 at 18:45

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