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I complained to someone and they did not reply back. So I want to write a mail again to them. I am confused which is correct:

I had complained to you but you have not replied yet.

Or

I complained to you but you have not replied yet.

Please also tell if its first one that is past perfect tense then why past perfect? For me first one sounds correct.

closed as off-topic by David, Dan Bron, Edwin Ashworth, Mark Beadles, Chris H Sep 4 '17 at 16:15

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  • No, the second one is correct, the first one isn't. There are numerous questions about use of the past perfect, both here and on the English Language Learners site. – WS2 Aug 31 '17 at 7:58
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    You actually used "I complained" in setting out your question. Your email is exactly the same. – Andrew Leach Aug 31 '17 at 8:39
  • Had you done it prior to this time or did you do it at this time? – Hot Licks Aug 31 '17 at 12:24
  • @HotLicks I did not get your question – parth Aug 31 '17 at 13:09
  • Which of the two options are you trying to describe? – Hot Licks Sep 1 '17 at 1:54
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Past simple is used to talk about an action that happened in the past, without any further reference. Past perfect is used to talk about an action that happened before another action in the past (which is usually expressed by the past simple).

An example including both: On Monday I complained to you, I had already complained on Friday, but you have not replied yet.

About the sentences you proposed the correct one is the second.

I complained to you but you have not replied yet.

Some references:
https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/simpas-pasper https://www.ecenglish.com/learnenglish/lessons/past-simple-or-past-perfect

  • Hello, Luke. As you might imagine, this is hardly the first time this has been said on ELU. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 31 '17 at 12:14
  • Luke thank you for answering and +1 for references. I read your references, sorry this may be a silly question but just wanted to ask you what if we use already in the sentence then can we use had? 'I had already complained to you but you have not replied yet.' – parth Aug 31 '17 at 13:39
  • You can use any indication to an action that happened before another action in the past. – Luke Aug 31 '17 at 13:42
  • Give reasons for downvote please. – Luke Aug 31 '17 at 17:47

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