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I've seen this link and I know what "as of X" means when X is a time/date.

Is it gramatically correct to use "as of X" when X is not a time/date? For example, Is it ok to use "as of" in the following sentence?

As of other classical facility location problems, this problem considers only location-allocation decisions.

or it is better to rewrite it to "Like other ..."? If both are correct, then which one is more formal, especially for a journal paper?

Edit:

I also found this sentence from the internet:

The author of this, as of other official histories of the Second World War, has been given free access to official documents.

Maybe it's "as well as of other ...", but the part "as well" is somehow dropped?

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    The context of your example isn't quite clear to me, but if you say that "Like other" would be correct, then "as of" is not correct. I currently can't think of an example that uses "as of" without a time/date. "As for" can be used in some cases, but not in your example. It means "in regards to", not "like other". – Flater Aug 25 '17 at 9:15
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    Like @Flater, I think the first example is incorrect; I think "As in other classical location problems..." would be best (although "Like other..." could also work). – TripeHound Aug 25 '17 at 10:04
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    @TripeHound: Good point, I had not thought of "as in". I would suggest you post this as an answer as it seems to be what the OP is looking for. – Flater Aug 25 '17 at 10:40
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Like Flater says in the comments, I too cannot think of a case where "As of" (as used in the first example) works without a time/date – that doesn't guarantee there are no such cases, but your example isn't one of them.

"Like other..." could work, but I believe the best alternative would be "As in...":

As in other classical facility location problems, this problem considers only location-allocation decisions.

Essentially it is saying, "As [is the case] in other [similar] problems, this problem considers [a particular aspect]...".

In the second example, the phrase is used differently, and – I believe – correctly:

The author of this, as of other official histories of the Second World War, has been given free access to official documents.

Here, it is saying "The author of [a specific work] [who is also the author of other related works] has been given...".


As pointed out in a comment, there are valid uses of "As of..." that don't explicitly mention a time/date, e.g.:

As of version 5, the application now makes coffee.

As of Android Nougat, battery life is infinite.

As of my last physical, I'm under doctor's orders to start exercising.

However, these all effectively establish a point-in-time: either through the chronology of product releases ("Version 5" and "Nougat" would have been released on specific dates) or life-events (the date of the speaker's last physical). They are thus just variants of the "As of [time/date]..." form.

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    Cromulent: "As of version 5, the application now makes coffee." Less cromulent: "As of Android Nougat, battery life is infinite." Probably cromulent: "As of my last physical, I'm under doctor's orders to start exercising." – whiskeychief Feb 19 '19 at 10:53
  • @whiskeychief Good point, but I would probably argue that – though not as specific as an explicit time/date – all those examples are establishing a "position in time" (or the chronology) of a product/life. I'll update the answer. – TripeHound Feb 19 '19 at 11:32
  • Agree, they all establish a specific point in time. – whiskeychief Feb 19 '19 at 11:33

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