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This question already has an answer here:

Please tell me how to use the positive question form of passive voice of the tense- Present perfect Continuous Tense?

The Positive Answer form could be as "I have been being taught". (Here, I am the student). I want to make a question from this tense in passive form. Please help me.

marked as duplicate by tchrist Aug 13 '17 at 19:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • The same way as you make any other question: by inverting the subject (I) with the first, tensed auxiliary (have) > Have I been being taught?. – StoneyB Aug 13 '17 at 16:43
  • In a natural context (straining credulity to its limits), the question that results in the answer I have been being taught would probably be: Have you been being taught? But then we would undoubtedly preface the answer with Yes: Yes, I have been being taught. The question to produce your answer as it stands could be something like: What has been being done to you? I am interested in why you asked this question. If it is a task from a grammar book, you might want to invest in a better one. – Shoe Aug 13 '17 at 17:31
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One would not use the phrase 'have been being taught', but just the perfect passive 'I have been taught'. The perfect passive continuous tense is not used often (if at all).

The question form then would simply be 'Have I been taught?'

  • Hello, AR. A duplicate has since been identified; there are one or two verbs that seem not to shun the perfect passive continuous (see the comment after @Erik Kowal's answer). – Edwin Ashworth Aug 13 '17 at 20:32
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In a comment, StoneyB wrote:

The same way as you make any other question: by inverting the subject (I) with the first, tensed auxiliary (have) > Have I been being taught?.

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In a comment, Shoe wrote:

In a natural context (straining credulity to its limits), the question that results in the answer I have been being taught would probably be: Have you been being taught? But then we would undoubtedly preface the answer with Yes: Yes, I have been being taught. The question to produce your answer as it stands could be something like: What has been being done to you? I am interested in why you asked this question. If it is a task from a grammar book, you might want to invest in a better one.

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If John has been teaching you English, then you’ve been being taught English by John.

However, this is an awkward enough construction that it is extremely uncommon: people simply don’t (care to) talk like that. We don’t like to pile up all those verbs together, and we certainly don’t like passives for them.

The following are all legal but not all expedient:

  • John will teach you English.
  • John taught you English.
  • John has taught you English.
  • John is teaching you English.
  • John has been teaching you English.

  • I will be taught English by John.
  • I was taught English by John.
  • I am being taught English by John.
  • I have been taught English by John.
  • I have been being taught English by John.

  • Who will teach you English?
  • What will John teach you?
  • Who taught you English?
  • Who has taught you English?
  • Who is teaching you English?
  • What is John teaching you?
  • What has John been teaching you?
  • Who has been teaching you English?
  • What are you being taught English by John?

  • Who will you be taught English by?
  • Who will you learn English from?
  • Who will you be being taught English by?
  • Who will you be learning English from?
  • Who have you been learning English from?
  • Who have you been taught English by?
  • Who have you been being taught English by?
  • What have you been being taught by John?

People just don’t say the long ones, almost ever. Please understand that native speakers are never asked to do on some test what you have been asked to do. It is of dubious usefulness, at best, and could easily be argued to be a complete waste of your time.

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