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Is there a single word or short phrase that means “experienced worker” (the opposite of “new hire”) and would work better than “local” in the following sentence?

The mailing “is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire feel like a local, fast.”

I have considered using "veteran," but I'm just wondering if there are other choices you can think of.

  • 2
    'Old Pro' is another way to say it... – Kristina Lopez Aug 11 '17 at 19:00
  • 5
    'expert' literally having experience – Mitch Aug 11 '17 at 20:48
  • It a lot of industries we use the term, "Subject Matter Expert (SME)" to relate that someone is a very experienced worker. It may not flow very well in that sentence though. – bhilgert Aug 11 '17 at 21:36
  • In one industry they use the term "street walker". – Hot Licks Aug 11 '17 at 22:37

10 Answers 10

13

Such a person is often referred to as an old hand.

From ODO:

old hand: a person with a lot of experience in something.

"the examiner is an old hand at the game"

synonyms: expert, past master, virtuoso, master, wizard, genius, artist, adept, professional, doyen, veteran, maestro, connoisseur, authority, grandmaster, master hand, skilled person

12

I honestly think you hit the nail on the head with veteran.

As a noun:

"A person who has had long experience in a particular field."

For example, "We'll have John train you, he's a veteran with the company."

Alternatively you could use it as an adjective:

"Experienced through long service or practice; having served for a long period:"

For example, "John can train you, he's our most veteran programmer."

8

In your context, you could use the word "professional."

“is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire feel like a professional, fast.”

Alternatively, if you want it to be somewhat hip and appeal to a younger audience you could use the word "boss."

“is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire feel like a boss, fast.”

Most of the other examples are two words.

  • 1
    I like all these suggestions — they're all good ones. Thank you! – debbiesym Aug 11 '17 at 21:12
6

Maybe a seasoned or a long-serving or a time-serving worker.

3

No love for "journeyman" and "master craftsman"?

Journeyman: "any experienced, competent but routine worker or performer."

The mailing “is packed with useful info and tips to help a journeyman feel like a master craftsman, fast.”

Or

The mailing “is packed with useful info and tips to help an apprentice feel like a journeyman, fast.”

2

I've heard this type of person referred to as a guru:

an influential teacher or popular expert.

"a management guru"

synonyms: expert, authority, pundit, leading light, master, specialist; informal whiz

2

Expert

From Merriam-Webster:

2: having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience

1

Whilst not directly an answer to the question itself, the quote in which you are stating doesn't, in my humble opinion, necessarily mean indicate someone highly experienced.

New hire, just means they're newly hired but could be a veteran in their own right already, just new to the company.

With that in mind, I'd suggest

The mailing “is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire feel like part of the team, fast.”

You could replace team with company, group, gang or something suitable to the exact nature of the mailing.

1

There is a lot of focus here on the thought that the word that you are looking for has to relate to someone experienced or a really talented person in some way. However the statement of the quote:

The mailing “is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire feel like a local, fast.”

Really has the context of "adjustment" or "adaptation" to the local customs. This is made even more evident by the verb "fast" at the end of the sentence. I believe that the way the quote is written is somewhat awkward and this makes a direct answer to the question difficult. If it were to be rewritten the context could be retained without having to resort to finding a single word to fit into that slot. You could try something like:

The mailing "is packed with useful info and tips to help a new hire quickly feel like part of the community."

0

In the case you need an expression ,not a single word , What comes to my mind is the idiom be a dab (hand) at sth ,at doing sth:

Farlex Dictionary of Idioms: To be skilled in a particular area. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Amanda can fix that hole in your blouse—she's a dab hand at sewing.

Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed: to be very good at an activity (often + at ) You should get Ann to have a look at that. She's a dab hand at getting stains out of clothes. (often + with ) I hear you're a dab hand with the paintbrush. (= you are good at painting)

IT is clear that, if you want to use a single word instead of an idiom , you can use dab and dab hand:

Merriam webester :

chiefly British : expert

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