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We have been invited to a wedding this fall, and in order to RSVP we have been asked to complete a Mad Lib for the couple.

I've hit a snag.

The sentence that is stumping us is "Our advice to the newly-weds is to make sure to always (verb) your (verb)(adjective plural) as much as possible."

The first (verb) is fairly easy, although the second (verb) followed by (adjective plural) is frustrating me to no end. Is this something that should even be able to work? If so, what am I not understanding?

Also ANY suggestions to help us finish this would be appreciated.

"Mad Libs is a phrasal template word game where one player prompts others for a list of words to substitute for blanks in a story, before reading the – often comical or nonsensical – story aloud. The game is frequently played as a party game or as a pastime."

  • More information required, I think! What is a "madlib"? What is this sentence for? What are you trying to say here? What does "adjective plural" mean? (Adjectives don't inflect for number) – Andrew Leach Aug 9 '17 at 17:19
  • Mad Libs is a phrasal template word game where one player prompts others for a list of words to substitute for blanks in a story, before reading the – often comical or nonsensical – story aloud. The game is frequently played as a party game or as a pastime. The sentence shown above is for the entertainment of the couple getting married I suppose. On the RSVP we've been asked to complete, as I stated originally. I don't know what "adjective plural" means...that's why I'm here...asking about it. – Lynnette Aug 9 '17 at 17:22
  • What follows your should be a noun phrase, and I can't see a way of forcing "(verb)(adjective plural)" to be a noun. Maybe I'm missing something; using "adjective plural" doesn't help because adjectives don't inflect for number. Perhaps it should be "(adjective)(plural)" like shiny kettles, and they intend "(verb)" to be a verbal adjective like whistling. – Andrew Leach Aug 9 '17 at 17:31
  • Well this was my thinking as well. What they are asking, just doesn't work. – Lynnette Aug 9 '17 at 17:35
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The suggested sentence

Our advice to the newly-weds is to make sure to always (verb) your (verb)(adjective plural) as much as possible

is problematic because your must be followed by a noun phrase. A verb certainly doesn't fit in that position. And "adjective plural" is meaningless because adjectives don't inflect for number in the way that French adjectives do, for example.

I surmise that the sentence is intended to be

Our advice to the newly-weds is to make sure to always (verb) your (adjective-from-verb)(adjective)(plural noun) as much as possible.

That interpretation would admit of something like

Our advice to the newly-weds is to make sure to always clean your renowned shiny kettles as much as possible.

Our advice to the newly-weds is to make sure to always oil your squeaking bed springs as much as possible.

Presumably if all you need to do is to provide a humorous sentence which fits a general pattern, any such sentence which vaguely satisfies the criteria will suffice. You might not even need a verb-derived adjective and perhaps many shiny kettles would be acceptable.

However, given that "(adjective plural)" is really problematic, good advice — probably the best advice — is, unfortunately, to ask those who devised the sentence to clarify what they meant. If everyone has the same requirement, maybe you could consult with other invitees to see how they have interepreted it.

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