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Which of the below is correct?

The soldier and his sword, which had been under the ruins, were dug out.

The soldier and his sword, who had been under the ruins, were dug out.

I tried to search the Internet for the rule for this but couldn't find any.

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    Often in English, the answer to such questions, for practical purposes, is to not say it that way. I'd find something like 'The soldier who had been under the ruins, along with his sword, was dug out.' to be more idiomatic. – Spagirl Aug 8 '17 at 13:28
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    In this context which is more likely to refer to an object whilst who refers to a person. Therefore the first sentence is ambiguous: the sword was buried, but was the soldier? – whanrott Aug 8 '17 at 13:35
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    The soldier and his sword – they had been under the ruins – were dug out. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 8 '17 at 14:22
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    The soldier and his sword were dug out from (under) the ruins. – 1006a Aug 8 '17 at 14:35
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    The soldier, as well as his sword, had been under the ruins was dug out. – mahmud koya Aug 8 '17 at 14:44

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