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In the Persian language, we have a word (گشایش)(goshayesh) that means both a rupture and a relief. We use it when we want to say that from a breach in something, a new thing emerged, that is better than the first situation. clearly speaking, some intellectuals use this word to describe a revolution. something has been destroyed and something new and more suitable has replaced it. In these days I am translating an article into German (German is as my mother tongue) and have had some problem with original text. The author is like me, not a native English speaker and has had a few poor word choices. For example, he has the word rupture in this text, while it is not, in my view, the most suitable word here. because it simply focuses on the breach of a harmonious situation and does not pay attention to a positive aspect of the case. Do know another word to use here?

While there are a number of plausible labels that might be attached to the 20th century, in terms of social history it was clearly the age of the working class. For the first time, working people who lacked property became a major and sustained political force. This rupture was heralded by Pope Leo xiii—leader of the world’s oldest and largest social organization—in his encyclical Rerum Novarum in 1891. The Pope noted that the progress of industry had led to ‘the accumulation of affluence among the few and misery (inopia) among the multitude’; but the period had also been characterized by the ‘greater self-confidence and tighter cohesion’ of the workers. [1] On a global level, trade unions gained a foothold in most big industrial enterprises, and in many other firms too. Working-class parties became major electoral forces—sometimes dominant ones—in Europe and its Australasian offshoots. The October Revolution in Russia provided a model of political organization and social change for China and Vietnam. Nehru’s India set itself the avowed goal of following a ‘socialist pattern of development’, as did the majority of post-colonial states. Many African countries spoke of building ‘working-class parties’ when they could boast no more proletarians than would fill a few classrooms.

  • Could you describe it as 'bittersweet'? – marcellothearcane Aug 7 '17 at 12:28
  • yes , but not exactly .As you know , in the case of revolution , the situation is always bitter for a part of people and sweet for other part . I describe it as bitter-sweet when i speak of the whole society , but not when I express and translate a special view of point . this event is for a person either pleasant or unpleasant. – kazhvan Aug 7 '17 at 12:38
  • I have tried my utmost to explain what I need and unfortunately can not add any explanation – kazhvan Aug 7 '17 at 12:41
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    Perhaps you might consider getting a bit more metaphoric - you could call the process lancing of the boil. – FumbleFingers Aug 7 '17 at 13:35
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    In the paragraph you included in your question, the word "evolution" would work well. While evolution does not always result in something better than what existed before--in which case de-volution would be the appropriate word, the process you describe seems to be evolving for the betterment of humankind. Don – rhetorician Aug 7 '17 at 21:35
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I'm not aware of any word that conveys this meaning. There are some idioms that apply, although they somewhat hinge on what you specifically mean.

There's no rose without a thorn.
It's always darkest before the dawn.

These idioms apply if the "rupture" is intentional (and/or necessary) to achieve the "relief".

A happy accident

This seems to fit better if you are trying to say that the "rupture" was started (for a different reason, or no particular reason), and only later ended up causing (unexpected) "relief".

I can't think of a better example for the second case.


edit

A somewhat looser definition of the second case could be serendipity:

The occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

However, serendipity inherently means that it was based on luck. If you are trying to imply that the "rupture" and "relief" are a logical cause and effect (not just two random coincidental events, they are connected), then "serendipity" does not apply.

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Focusing on the part of the passage with the word "rupture":

"For the first time, working people who lacked property became a major and sustained political force. This rupture was heralded by Pope Leo xiii—leader of the world’s oldest and largest social organization—in his encyclical Rerum Novarum in 1891."

Rupture is clearly the wrong word because implies something that is painful and problematic, which we can assume doesn't apply to working people getting more political power. It's a bit too medical, as well, I think.

"Revolution" is a better word, but is too strong, and is too easily confused with a literal political revolution, where the workers (for example) actually revolt and seize power. This isn't what is being talked about here.

"Movement" is one option but again might imply too much organisation, making the reader think of something more specific, with a name, like an "-ism", rather than something more general and organic.

"Trend" is another option, and describes it in neutral terms.

"Upheaval" is perhaps a better option, as it implies a major change which will probably affect all existing structures in some way. It's similar to rupture in that it can be used to describe earthquakes and volcanoes, but I think it fits better than "rupture" when talking about social change.

I think I'd go with upheaval. It doesn't necessarily convey the "both good and bad" that you asked for, but it fits the context, and upheavals are understood to often have positive and negative aspects.

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We use it when we want to say that from a breach in something, a new thing emerged, that is better than the first situation.

Focussing on this part of your description, I would suggest metamorphosis.

To me, this signifies both the destruction of the old order and the birth of the new [improved] situation.

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In English, in historical texts, one often sees: this break with the past. Not rupture. Rupture suggests that the situation has boiled over or broken out (like a boil). And in English, we also often say a welcome break from the past. Not just a single word. Often, the simplest solution is best....

Other suggestions such as revolution, upheaval etc. are too heavy to convey the meaning you are searching for.

Idioms: break with or from the past, welcome break from the past, welcome break with the past.

Reference

"Pope Leo makes a break with the Christian Fathers that is profound."

in Social Catholicism in Europe: From the Onset of Industrialization to the First World War Book

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I expand on the elegant typology offered by Max Williams by suggesting that a further replacement for Rupture is "Disruption".

Although there are traditional definitions (e.g. disturbance or problems which interrupt an event, activity, or process https://www.google.com.au/search?rls=en&q=define+disruption) the word "Disruption" is developing an extended meaning because of its use in marketing. Today a disruptive product is one that meets the needs of a market segment because an incumbent in the market finds it almost impossible to respond to a disruptive product. Consider Tesla's rise vs General Motors, who crushed their first EV saying it didn't fit their business model. Perhaps the Pope is arguing that the Disruption had the potential to be a positive force for the un-propertied working people.

In a new-market disruption, the unserved customers are unserved precisely because serving them would be unprofitable given the incumbent’s business model (Prof. Clay Christensen, Harvard Business School, in 'The Innovator’s Dilemma').

Arguably - even though this is not about marketing - this word DOES seem to now convey some of the 'both good and bad' aspects sought by the question.

  • ( Perhaps the Pope is arguing that the Disruption had the potential to be a positive force for the un-propertied working people.). That is exactly what Pope means. you know what come from the rupture to mind is not positive . we would not understand the message of Pope , If we did not have previous historical knowledge.so what I need is more suitable word to express a good and bad accident ? – kazhvan Aug 7 '17 at 15:29
  • You should add a link/reference to a dictionary definition of disruption (in the relevant sense). Perhaps then you may get up-votes. – alwayslearning Aug 7 '17 at 17:27
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A major change that involves massive disruption followed by relief could be called a tectonic change or tectonic shift, though in the case of the text cited in the question, I would simply recommend the word shift.

While there are a number of plausible labels that might be attached to the 20th century, in terms of social history it was clearly the age of the working class. For the first time, working people who lacked property became a major and sustained political force. This shift was heralded by Pope Leo xiii

From Cambridge English Dictionary:

A tectonic change is a very important one that will have major effects:

He led the company through a period of tectonic shifts in the movie industry.

The process of writing is in the midst of a tectonic change caused by changes in the technology writers use.

And simply shift:

8.f. To undergo transmutation; to change.

  • OED
  • BEST OFFER yet. but do you think we can use these compounds in a political text ? – kazhvan Aug 8 '17 at 22:31
  • @kazhvan Is that a joke? – Lambie Aug 9 '17 at 22:46
  • WHAT is a joke? – kazhvan Aug 9 '17 at 23:13
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In medicine a boil, pimple or similar pustule of the skin is relieved once ruptures and its contents are emitted. the pustule is said to "Express" its contents. That is the natural process of the skin.

Express is the word you need but may not be well understood by your audience.

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    Welcome to SE EL&U. Nice answer Elliot! All it needs for SE EL&U is a link to an online dictionary definition that backs it up, preferably with a quotation for that particular meaning. This may seem a bit tedious to newcomers, but, if you think about it, you should appreciate that it allows the poster and others to check your answer. It would be a good idea to complete the guided tour to get a better idea of how this site works to help with future questions and answers. – David Aug 7 '17 at 18:20

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