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I just finished recording an audio file for one of my podcasts. And I'm debating whether I should delete the following sentence:

If you haven't already watched my first video, there's a link to it in the description below.

I am trying to suggest to viewers that they watch my videos in order, which I think the sentence does. But I think this sentence is also ungrammatical and nonsensical.

Whether or not my viewers have watched my first video, a link to that video will be in the description.

I suppose I could change it to

If you haven't already watched my first video, please watch that first. You can find a link to it in the description below.

But changing audio files is such a pain. Would it be ok to leave the sentence as is?

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  • Related: Non-conditional IFs
    – herisson
    Aug 7, 2017 at 2:50
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    This conditional refers not to the content of the clause, but to its performative. It means 'If you haven't already watched my first video, I hereby tell you that there's a link to it in the description below.' That's because one can always add "I hereby tell you that S', to any sentence S without changing the meaning -- it's obvious, and therefore it is presupposed and can be referred to. Examples abound: In case you weren't tuned in, the score is Detroit 2, Chicago 1; If you need one, there are umbrellas in the hall. Etc. Aug 7, 2017 at 3:24
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    For me, the gap is in the logic, not the grammar, worth resolving as follows: If you haven't already watched my first video yet, use the link to it in the description below. Aug 7, 2017 at 3:46

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