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How would you word it properly?

Could you hang a bag of IV fluid for Patient 123?

Could you hang a bag of IV fluid on Patient 123?

Could you hang a bag of IV fluid to Patient 123?

Which one is correct? If there's none then how would you word it?

This is an extension to the previous post "Put up an IV fluid". Would it matter if I used hang instead of put up? Thanks.

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    #1 makes the most sense, #2 would be hanging the bag on the patient, and #3 doesn't make sense – depperm Aug 4 '17 at 13:59
  • okay. I would usually say 'for' as well – Rafael M Aug 4 '17 at 14:03
  • No doubt about it, @Rafael M -- it is a service you are performing for the (benefit of the) patient. Both 'on' and 'to' would even be options only if the IV STAND were somehow physically attached to the patient, which is very unlikely if not impossible. – English Student Aug 4 '17 at 14:11
  • you are right @choster – Rafael M Aug 4 '17 at 14:17
  • @choster: while very much on the same topic, doesn't a different verb warrant a different question, as it can use a completely different preposition? I agree with the linked answer's notion that "put up" is not commonly used, but that does not really speak to the applicability of "to hang". OP's example seems usable in this context. – Flater Aug 4 '17 at 15:31
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Could you hang a bag of IV fluid for Patient 123?

This is correct. You are doing it for [the good of] the patient.

Could you hang a bag of IV fluid on Patient 123?

Unless you are going to attach the bag to the patient (if there's a little hook attached to his head), this is incorrect.

It would be correct to say "hang a bag on the hook".

Could you hang a bag of IV fluid to Patient 123?

This makes no grammatical sense. "To" does not belong here.

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  • If you were to word it yourself, how would you say it? Like you are to run a liter of fluid through to the patient? – Rafael M Aug 4 '17 at 16:03
  • I haven't really though about it since I've never been in a medical profession (nor do I hear much casual English around me since I'm not a native speaker), but the "for" example is the sentence I'd use. – Flater Aug 5 '17 at 13:57

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