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This question already has an answer here:

Is there an English word for "a person who is spoken to"? I guess you could say speakee or talkee or something but I'm looking for a word that's already well established.

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Laurel, David, Mari-Lou A, marcellothearcane Aug 3 '17 at 8:40

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    Addressee is the usual term in the trade for second-person referents. – John Lawler Aug 2 '17 at 18:23
  • You could use listener, although that implies that the person is actually listening, which you may or may not want to do. – vpn Aug 2 '17 at 18:25
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    I lean on audience a lot in IT documentation. "The audience for this procedure is..." – Yosef Baskin Aug 2 '17 at 20:14
  • @JohnLawler That sounds like pretty close, but does addressee require that the person is actually addressed, i.e. mentioned by the speaker? If so, it's not quite exactly what I'm looking for, thought the difference is probably negligible in most situations. – Nardog Aug 2 '17 at 20:30
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    The addressee in a written communication is not physically addressed by the writer. And many intended addressees are not physically addressed, even by spoken communication -- If I shout and you don't hear me, you're still the addressee (though not the recipient) of my shout. – John Lawler Aug 2 '17 at 21:37
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The person being spoken to is often called the listener

Cambridge Learners Dictionary defines a listener as someone who listens.

I hope that helps.

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    Hi, user242899. Your answer would be improved by citing a dictionary. – vpn Aug 2 '17 at 18:29
  • Point taken. New to this so I will next time. Thank you – user242899 Aug 2 '17 at 19:09
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    @user242899 please take the first comment as a strong suggestion to update and improve this answer. Site policy, down-vote danger and all that. – Bookeater Aug 2 '17 at 19:29
  • Helpful? Not really. 'Someone who listens' is not identical to 'someone who is spoken to'; it might be discovered that one is trying to get through to a deaf person. Also, this is hardly suitable for a site aimed at linguists. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 2 '17 at 22:35
  • Suggest an alternative. I was under the impression this site was for English learners not just linguists. My brother is deaf and we say he listens to the TV. I went with what the asker wanted based on the clues in his question. PS; cant see any other answers- so much for the linguists. – user242899 Aug 3 '17 at 2:22

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