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Please note that I've tried googling variations on this, but usually just end up with "words that rhyme with unexpected" which is obviously not what I'm going for.

There's a technique I've seen used often, in parody songs/raps especially, where the usual rhyming scheme is subverted and a line ends with something else that doesn't rhyme, and I'm wondering if there's a specific literary term for this.

For example, in the Game of Thrones Recap Rap, there's a part where Ryan Tellez is talking about Joffrey and says "He's the biggest f***ing asshole I've ever f***ing seen, I punch my TV every time he comes on screen!" but then later he's talking about Ramsay Bolton and subverts a repetition of it with "He's the biggest f***ing asshole I've ever f***ing seen, I punch my TV every time he...oh I did that one already."

Most often when I see this employed, the ending of the line is sung/spoken rapidly to still fit the music and usually in a deadpan tone.

  • From your own description: "the usual rhyming scheme is subverted". That seems like the most appropriate description. It's not just a concept, it is a subversion of a concept that was expected. Making this any more terse would change the meaning. – Flater Jul 28 '17 at 15:04
  • Uh… no; there isn't, and even though it clearly looks like one, that is not an example of the the usual rhyming scheme being subverted… If it were, the words oh I did that one already would be wholly irrelevant. Also, as you said, this is employed when the ending of the line is sung/spoken to fit the music… which oh I did that one already doesn't, does it? – Robbie Goodwin Jul 30 '17 at 23:19
  • It's subverted in the sense that you're expecting the line to rhyme and it doesn't. And when I say it's spoken to fit, I mean in terms of the speed at which the rapper says it, so it still fits in the bar. – John Clifford Jul 31 '17 at 15:53

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