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I don't quite understand the usage of "for" in "After that, Democrats and Republicans may offer amendments for as long as they want."

"offer for" does not seem a phrase.

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    "for" goes with the time period that follows, for example - for however long they want, for ever. Jul 28, 2017 at 7:56

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Is the following more understandable?

After that, Democrats and Republicans may offer amendments for three days.

"As long as they want" plays the same role in your sentence as "three days" does" in mine.

You're hinting that you think the word "for" can be omitted from your sentence without changing its meaning. You're right!

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  • As the word "for" usually expresses the period of time and is used in perfect tense, I am not sure if it is used properly here. my understanding is that the prep word "in" is more suitable. eg. "After that, Democrats and Republicans may offer amendments IN three days." Any comments?
    – dan
    Jul 30, 2017 at 2:17

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