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I remember reading about this genre on Wikipedia, but forgot what it was called. Books in this genre are wandering/doing things without purpose. There isn't really a plot, just connected small stories. It is close to Picaresque novels, but instead of poor main character it about is a rich, carefree main character. The stories are often humorous or satiric or both.

P.G Wodehouse's Psmith books and others are examples of this genre.

Another detail I seem to recall is that the words has the prefix "voy" or "voyage" or something along those lines. I could remember wrong, though.

Words that are close, but not it so far are:

  • Picaresque
  • Milesian tale
  • Travelogue
  • Absurdist fiction
  • Do you mean a Miliesian tale? – Davo Jul 27 '17 at 15:32
  • It's close, but not what I'm looking for. I seem to recall that the word has the prefix "voy" or "voyage" or something along those lines. But I might misremember. – loading... Jul 27 '17 at 15:35
  • All I can think of is voyeuristic but I don't think that is what you're after. – Lambie Jul 27 '17 at 16:03
  • @Lambie Haha, yup, not what I'm after =) – loading... Jul 27 '17 at 16:05
  • Vagabond and vagrant both start with a "v," but I can't find any references to these words describing a type of literature. – vpn Jul 27 '17 at 16:08
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Is what you describe wanderings? Particular types would be the knight-errant, the gunslinger of Westerns, etc.

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Those could be called odysseys. Named for the best known literary work of that type.

  • Odyssey is quite accurate if it is an epic journey with a serious narrative, and I can think of several great novels that could be described by that term, including certain War/ Civil War novels, but OP seems to be asking about light-hearted wanderings @GEdgar: "Books in this genre are wandering/doing things without purpose. There isn't really a plot, just connected small stories." – English Student Dec 25 '17 at 0:48

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