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I'm looking for a word for the property of liquids that means the liquid has a high resistance to temperature change. The closest thing I've found is 'high specific heat capacity' but it's a one-word term. I heard it on a science TV show I was watching and I can't remember what the word was.

Clarification: I mean it takes a lot of energy to change the temperature. but the word I'm looking for means specifically that the liquid has a high specific heat capacity

  • Non-conductive? – Xanne Jul 24 '17 at 17:17
  • What, exactly, do you mean by a high resistance to temperature change? Do you mean that it takes a lot of energy to raise the temperature? If so, then the term is high specific heat capacity. Period. If you mean that the liquid maintains some property even if its temperature changes greatly, then perhaps one of the answers suits you. – ab2 Jul 24 '17 at 19:39
  • yes i mean it takes a lot of energy to change the temperature. but the word i'm looking for means specifically that the liquid has a high specific heat capacity. – sam-pyt Jul 24 '17 at 20:01
  • "High specific heat" is about as good as you can expect to do. – Hot Licks Jul 24 '17 at 22:15
  • Though note that you could achieve the high specific heat capacity by employing an endothermic chemical reaction of some sort. – Hot Licks Jul 24 '17 at 22:17
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"Thermostable"; also, more scientifically, "having a high specific heat."

thermostable -- Wiktionary

(adj.) 1. Physically or chemically unaffected by high temperatures

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    The word DOES NOT fit your definition. – Hot Licks Jul 24 '17 at 16:34
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Not an exact fit but see eurythermal, defined by MERRIAM WEBSTER as

Tolerating a wide range of temperature.

Also, you can see related words such as thermoduric and extremophile.

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