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Consider the following example:

To add to the confusion, every New Year's Day a person, according to this Korean counting system, becomes a year older, regardless of his or her actual birthday.

This clause is restrictive as "his or her" refers to "person". So, then why is there a comma?

  • The comma is not required. Regardless modifies becomes, not person, because becoming older disregards the actual brthday. – Yosef Baskin Jul 20 '17 at 21:15
  • You seem to think that if "his" appears in a clause, the clause is restrictive. Why? – Peter Shor Jul 20 '17 at 21:19
  • The classic sentence is "I read the New York Times, which prints all the news that's fit to print." – Xanne Jul 21 '17 at 4:49
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You can remove ", according to this Korean counting system, " without changing the meaning of the sentence. A non-essential element like this is always surrounded in commas.

"His or her" doesn't have anything to do with the placement of that comma.

See below:

To add to the confusion, every New Year's Day a person becomes a year older, regardless of his or her actual birthday.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/607/05/

  • Oh, I did not even notice that that was nonessential. – G.B Jul 20 '17 at 21:57

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