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I'm looking for a negative adjective to match each of the five classical senses. Each word should be short, simple, well known, the sort of word that would appeal or be known to children, and preferentially end in -y in order to form a nice set.

  • hearing - it sounds noisy
  • sight - it looks ugly
  • smell - it smells smelly
  • taste - it tastes yucky
  • touch - it feels yucky

I'm looking for two words to replace yucky for taste and touch.

I've thought of slimy and dirty for touch, but I can't think of anything for taste, i.e. the opposite of tasty or yummy. The words should immediately or overwhelmingly evoke the sense it is linked to. That's why I don't like yucky; it's too generic.

Each word should work by itself: it is noisy (obviously hearing, discounting poor fashion sense); it is ugly (obviously sight), etc.

Suggestions?

  • This should be five different questions. – Tushar Raj Jul 19 '17 at 9:44
  • @TusharRaj No, only two. I've already got the other three words. – CJ Dennis Jul 19 '17 at 9:45
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    touch -- icky.. – ab2 Jul 19 '17 at 10:14
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    "Gross" doesn't end in y but would be good for taste. I'd replace "smelly" with "stinky." Also, why are you trying to replace "yucky" for taste? I think that's the quintessential toddler word for something that tastes bad. – MAA Jul 19 '17 at 10:25
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    Textbook case of the matter discussed in Single word requests, crosswords, and the fight against mediocrity. – tchrist Jul 19 '17 at 13:13
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For taste, from Oxford Dictionary:

unpalatable

ADJECTIVE

Not pleasant to taste.

Nothing comes to mind for touch besides texture-specific words. "Grimy", "slimy", and "chalky" are all words I would use to describe textures that are personally repulsive in the right context. Touch-related words typically describe unique textures; their connotation often depends on the context and the reader/listener. Consequently, the negative feeling of the word depends on what you are describing and the context you are describing it in. Adverbial qualifiers ("overwhelmingly", "awfully", etc.) may be added to change the effect of the adjective.

If you really want a texture-neutral negative adjective for touch, I would stick to describing something as an "unpleasant texture" or something to that effect.

  • Each word should be short, simple, well known, the sort of word that would appeal or be known to children, and preferentially end in -y in order to form a nice set. How does unpalatable qualify? – CJ Dennis Sep 1 '17 at 3:17

protected by tchrist Jul 19 '17 at 13:11

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