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  1. regular events British English speakers say that something takes place at weekends.

The beach gets very crowded at weekends.

American speakers usually say that something takes place weekends or on weekends.

He often studies evenings and weekends.

On weekends I usually sleep late.

  1. single events

You can say that an event takes place during a particular weekend.

Will you be visiting relatives during the holiday weekend?

On a weekday, the weekend or this weekend can refer either to the previous weekend or the following weekend. You can use at, during, or over in front of the weekend. Don't use any preposition in front of this weekend.

Her new film came out at the weekend.

I'll call you over the weekend.

My birthday was this weekend.

We might be able to go skiing this weekend.

Here is what I understood, suppose that today is Tuesday & I say:

Her new film came out at the weekend. (the previous weekend, ie 4 days ago)

I'll call you ạt the weekend. (the following weekend., ie that will happen in 4 days)

Her new film came out this weekend. (the previous weekend, ie 4 days ago)

does "Her new film came out this weekend."="Her new film came out last weekend."?

I'll call you this weekend. (the following weekend., ie that will happen in 4 days)

Am I misunderstanding something?

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    Seems like you have it right. What is bothering you about it?
    – Jim
    Jul 17, 2017 at 0:15
  • I hear a lot of people say "Her new film came out ~over~ the weekend" to refer backwards.
    – Tom22
    Jul 17, 2017 at 0:27
  • @Jim, so "I call you the following weekend after this weekend"="I call you in 13 days" (today is Tuesday)
    – Tom
    Jul 17, 2017 at 1:04
  • @Tom, in your reply to Jim, native speakers, in my part of the UK, would say 'I'll call you the weekend after next'. In practice people often, in the UK at least, add a clarifying word if there is any potential for confusion about what weekend is being discussed 'this weekend coming' or 'the weekend just passed' for example.
    – Spagirl
    Jul 18, 2017 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

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"This weekend" can refer to both the previous or following weekend, based on the tense of the sentence. If the sentence is written in past tense, "this weekend" generally refers to the previous.

Her new film came out (past tense) this weekend. (the previous weekend)

If the sentence is written in future tense, "this weekend" generally refers to the next weekend.

I will call (future tense) you this weekend. (the following weekend)

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  • so,"her new film came out this weekend"="...last weekend"?
    – Tom
    Jul 17, 2017 at 1:07
  • @Tom Yes. Since the sentence uses "came", which is in past tense, it means that the film has already come out. This can only be true if "this weekend" refers to the last weekend and not the next weekend.
    – as4s4hetic
    Jul 17, 2017 at 1:17
  • 1
    @Tom I agree it is weird. Her new film came out last weekend is what I would say. It gets worse if the word next is used, on a Thursday or Friday. Does it mean this coming weekend or the weekend 10 days from now? Always verify, especially about picking someone up at the airport.
    – ab2
    Jul 17, 2017 at 1:27
  • 3
    @Tom - It’s no different than saying “Her book came out in October” and “Her book comes out in October”
    – Jim
    Jul 17, 2017 at 2:07
  • 1
    @Tom: Imagine telling a coworker on monday "I went to see a movie this weekend". The tense you are using reveals that you are implicitly saying "this [past] weekend". It is omitted because it is already clear from context, as you are using past tense.
    – Flater
    Jul 17, 2017 at 11:06

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