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Is a singular subject with a plural predicate nominative ever ungrammatical (or unacceptable)?

I ask because several non-native speakers have told me that a singular subject with a plural predicate nominative in English is NEVER acceptable, or at least usually unacceptable, and, as a native speaker, I am baffled by this stance.

Just doing a few grammar thought experiments, I get sentences like those below, which seem perfectly fine.

This book is 300 pages.

One dollar is 100 cents.

America is 50 states.

Is the issue that the subject and predicate are different nouns? What if the nouns are the same, like below?

This book is five books.

Still seems acceptable. Maybe the one book is a compendium of multiple individual books.

So, when is a singular subject with a plural predicate nominative unacceptable? Always? Never? If sometimes, in what grammatical situations or contexts?

  • There are acceptable cases where subject and predicative differ in grammatical number. For example, "The only thing we need now is new curtains"; "The major asset of the team is its world-class opening bowlers", "This gadget is five different tools in one". Unacceptable number mismatches are usually due to semantic incompatibility between the terms, e.g. *"The person who complained most was my parents"; where a single person is identified with a set of two. – BillJ Jul 13 '17 at 6:57
  • "plural predicate nominative" may be your red herring. There's no plural, only a collective/ collection. HTH. – Kris Jul 13 '17 at 7:21
  • @Kris"Beth is a teacher and a writer." Is that a plural predicate nominative? Multiple predicate nominative? – Zan700 Jul 18 '18 at 23:32
  • Also @Zan700 I can see you are tying yourself up in knots, so not seeing the wood for the trees. – Kris Jul 19 '18 at 5:58
  • @Kris OK, let's start again. You can have a sentence with a singular subject, a plural subject or a compound subject. You can have a sentence with a singular simple predicate but also compound simple predicates. You can have a sentence with a predicate nominative. Can you have a sentence with a--let's not call it plural--"compound" predicate nominative? Can you have a sentence with a compound of a predicate nominative and a predicate adjective? – Zan700 Jul 20 '18 at 23:50

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