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What would you call a invited person who comes in a restricted party hosted by a fellow collegian and then invites most of the uninvited members in the college and apparently blatantly shows off his generosity and the party as if his own?

That is, he invites others to party and says "feel free to have food" (the food which is limited due to restriction on invitees) and moreover it appears to the uninvited people who come to the party that he is the host of the party.

  • Are you saying that this person telephones others and boasts, or actually invites others to the party? – Andrew Leach Jul 12 '17 at 8:52
  • Actually he invites others to the party and says "feel free to have food" (the food which is limited due to restriction on invitees) and over the top it appears to the uninvited people who come to the party as if he is the host of the party. He is a shameless senior and hold good amount of power but still it is unethical as per my opinion. – AMN Jul 12 '17 at 9:10
  • 'Off the next invitation list.' But is this really a rant? There are many words and phrases that could be used in this situation, but I doubt there's a word defined as 'a person invited to a private party (hosted by a fellow collegian) who brings along most of the uninvited members in the college and then flagrantly shows off 'his generosity', implying the party is his own'. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 12 '17 at 9:22
  • A type of 'impostor'. – Kace36 Jul 12 '17 at 9:25
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There's no definition for the exact description you've provided, but this person's bad behavior can be aptly described by calling them a usurper.

Usurper
noun

A person who takes a position of power or importance illegally or by force.
e.g. ‘a usurper of the throne’

For your context, I would call them a "party usurper".

Basically, their behavior boils down to this:

Cartoon of someone appropriating another's invention

Image from Nedroid

| improve this answer | |
  • While appreciating the irony, use of others' material does need to be acknowledged here. The original is apparently by Nedroid – Andrew Leach Jul 12 '17 at 10:15
  • @AndrewLeach: Fair point (also on the irony), will update for correctness. – Flater Jul 12 '17 at 10:18
  • I don't think 'usurper' would be what most people call this person. And there are very few relevant Google hits for "party usurper". – Edwin Ashworth Jul 12 '17 at 10:35
  • @EdwinAshworth: Does this person not supplant the actual host of the party? If not literally (openly calling themselves the host), then at least in practice (giving permissions that only the host is allowed to give)? I agree that 'usurper' tends to operate on a more official level than the OP's context, which is basically nothing more than a social faux-pas. But figurative usage should still apply. Calling someone a dictator does not always mean that you think they are a literal head of state, for example. – Flater Jul 12 '17 at 10:40
  • 'What do you call a person' calls for an idiomatic answer. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 12 '17 at 20:41

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