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The object in the sentence

"Eighty-six forty-five."

refers to the 45th president of the US, as in Bush 41 vs. Bush 43.

The meaning of the verb eighty-sixeject, bar, reject, discard, cancel (Google) – has been addressed in several answers here (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4).

Should forty-five be capitalized? Is it a proper noun?

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    There's a silent down vote; is there something that needs to be done to improve the question? – uhoh Jul 12 '17 at 7:53
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    I believe this is an appropriate and interesting question, and I have upvoted. Thanks for asking it. – Davo Jul 12 '17 at 13:27
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    It's no sentence, but if it's a headline, your caps are there and your problem solved. – Yosef Baskin Jul 12 '17 at 14:59
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    @YosefBaskin thanks for your comment. Can you tell me in what way it is not a valid English sentence? This (off-topic) community Wiki suggests several very short sentences, so I'm guessing that it's not the length of you are objecting to. Is it the validity of one of the words that you are questioning? – uhoh Jul 12 '17 at 16:34
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    @YosefBaskin based on the definitions given it's an imperative, which can be read as "Eject Trump" – Chris H Jul 21 '17 at 10:58
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Two reasons why it should have inital caps. Neither alone is perfect.

"Forty-Five" in this case is essentially a nickname. A nickname would be capitalised. To stick to a related example, "Tricky Dick" always has capitals (on both words, Dick of course always would as it's a name).

Many style guides treat "Figure 45" as a proper noun in writing (I believe CMOS is one of the exceptions). By analogy "President 45" or "President Forty-Five" would be proper, then drop the "President".

As this is rather unusual, writing "eighty-six Forty-Five" draws attention to the proper noun, which is no bad thing.

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