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This is a sentence from Bertrand Russell' work. Notice that the sub-clauses following both ... and ... do not exactly match. I wonder if Russell made a grammatical mistake here.

I was impressed by the facts both that China had been able to settle all her other border disputes by negotiation and had already, before this last and disastrous flare-up, offered to negotiate with India the border questions which were in dispute between them.

Source: Russell, Bertrand. Unarmed Victory. New York: Simon And Schuster, 1963. 102. Print.

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    The word 'both' would normally sit after 'that China' and not before. – Yosef Baskin Jul 7 '17 at 17:38
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Russel is impressed by two facts:

  1. that China settled all her border disputes by negotiation and

  2. that it had already (before some "disastrous flare-up" mentioned earlier) offered to negotiate with India the border questions which were in dispute between them.

Notice that the sub-clauses following both... and ... do not exactly match.

The only mismatch I see is the slight violation of parallelism due to a missing that it before the second fact, i.e. and that it had already &c. One may or may not consider it a grammatical error depending on one's conscientiousness.

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    I guess this is called the native speaker's privilege. They can take some liberty to trade off grammar for eloquence. – George Chen Jul 7 '17 at 17:51
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    As a prescriptivist, I am convinced that language is a beautiful system governed by strict and logical rules. I therefore refuse both the native speaker's privilege and the poetic license. – Ant_222 Jul 7 '17 at 19:32
  • ESL speakers will appreciate that. – George Chen Jul 7 '17 at 19:59
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    What year do you plump for as being the one when all the rules were finalised? Which authority has the final say when they disagree? What do you make of Quirk and Svartvik's conclusion that some constructions are say 20% or 80% acceptable? Do you reject extra-grammatical idioms? – Edwin Ashworth Jul 7 '17 at 23:19
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    @Ant_222: You are free to refuse any privilege or licence you choose, assuming you are entitled to them. You are not free to deny them to other English-speakers. (And if you want a chat discussion, itr is normal to set up a chatroom yourself). – TimLymington Jul 10 '17 at 21:38

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