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I have the following sentences and not sure if one of them is better than the others. So, there is a threshold for user participation. If user participation is less than the threshold then I call it they under-participate. I believe this is fine.

However, users can also just do the threshold or more. This is the part with which I have problems phrasing. Any of the followings is acceptable and conveys the meaning that I meant to:

... users who are likely to under-participate and users who are likely to participate as required or more

... users who are likely to under-participate and users who are likely to participate as required or go beyond/exceed the expectations

... users who are likely to under-participate and users who are likely to participate sufficiently as required for the worst case.

UPDATE: FURTHER DETAILS

Let's say users are supposed to post 3 replies in a discussion forum. However, some of them had less than 3 replies whereas others have posted at least 3 replies. Here is a more generic template:

... aims to identify users-with-less-than-3-replies versus users-with-3-or-more-replies.

So, the users belong to either group. First group under-participates. But, I am having trouble finding a phrase to concisely indicate the second group. For example, over-participate would not work since participation at threshold level is also fine actually. Also, it has negative connotations.

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    I like the second one--it conveys your idea of going beyond the requirements. – Xanne Jun 23 '17 at 8:13
  • Without further context I feel at a loss. Your sample phrases seem to be noun phrases which collectively just identify 'all the users'. If you want suggestions of alternate formulations, it may be helpful to know what the users are users of, what participation means in your case and what comes before your phrases to turn them I to whole sentences. – Steve Lovell Jun 23 '17 at 19:41
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    @SteveLovell thanks for the suggestion. Does update answer your question? – renakre Jun 23 '17 at 20:14
  • I agree, 'over-participates' is bad. How do you treat the two groups differently, you might be able to base your labels on that instead. – Steve Lovell Jun 23 '17 at 20:22
  • Or perhaps you are trying to predict which such group someone will fall in rather than base other things on which group they are part of? – Steve Lovell Jun 23 '17 at 20:27
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Instead of over-perform...

Outperform [out-per-fawrm] verb (used with object)

  1. to surpass in excellence of performance; do better than.

Source: Dictionary.com

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