I want to say England I will come to visit you can I use "here I come"?

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  • They say it about California. – Sven Yargs Jun 18 '17 at 8:15
  • Here I come can be used when you are about to go there or already on the way. – Codeformer Jun 18 '17 at 8:37
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I want to say England I will come to visit you can I use "here I come"?

"Here I come!" is a whimsical expression which often has an exclamation mark. It's also in the present tense, and so means that you've started the journey: "I am on my way".

If you want to say "I will come to visit" then you can say exactly that. It may be a little more common to use "I will come to see you", and if you want to emphasise that it's something you really want then there is "I would love to come to see you".

If you want to write more casually then remember the contractions I'm, I'll, I'd etc. for I am, I will, and I would.

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