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There are families that have a certain genetic marker of the eyes, looking more or less like the opposite of the epicanthic fold of Asian eyes. I have seen it in some Native Americans and some people of French descent.

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If you look at the outer and upper corners of this Native American girl’s eyes, you will see it.

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The royal family also has this. It is not common, and is a marker in my (native american) family. The older one gets, the more pronounced it becomes, and it tends to droop in the upper corners of the eyes. What is this called?

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    – tchrist
    Jul 9, 2017 at 17:21
  • I have this trait, but I wish people would stop using the term “oriental.” When used in reference to people, it is considered racist.
    – Bob
    Jan 11, 2021 at 1:11
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    By 'opposite' you don't mean the negative of the meaning, but rather locationally on the other side of the eye? Nasal for the usual meaning and lateral for the outside, on the other side away from the nose? (there's gotta be official medical terms for those two but I can't seem to remember)
    – Mitch
    Jan 11, 2021 at 17:06
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    @Mitch I posted a self-answer on this and it includes those medical terms you cite. Jan 11, 2021 at 17:57
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    @Cascabel 'medial' and 'lateral' on re-reading yours, that's what I was looking for.
    – Mitch
    Jan 12, 2021 at 2:10

2 Answers 2

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It is still called an epicanthic fold.

Canthus refers to the “corners” of the eye. There is the medial (or internal), canthus; and the lateral (or external), canthus. enter image description here

Epi, meaning over or above, can be used with canthus to indicate a covering of the corner of the eye. More accurately, this particular facial aspect can be called a lateral (or external) canthal fold, or simply an external epicanthus.

However (and unsurprisingly), there is also a cosmetology term to describe this feature.

Downturned, as seen in these guides to eye makeup from different manufacturers.

enter image description here

I also saw the terms "droopy" and "puppy dog" eyes to describe this.

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    I now know more about makeup for specific eye types than I ever thought I would need in this lifetime. Jun 20, 2017 at 20:31
  • Recently, there has been some controversy over the usage of the term "fox" eyes and its appropriation by occidental people. Jan 11, 2021 at 22:21
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I use the term "outer epicanthic folds" for myself and my northern English family.

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  • Interesting. While half of my family comes also from Northern England and Ireland, the other half is Native American, and I have never been sure which side of the family this characteristic comes from. Actually, still not sure. Jun 20, 2017 at 20:55

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