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I am unable to find a fitting definition for the word "peron" as used in Le Morte d'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory. The book uses many archaic words, but usually I am able to find the definition online or figure out an approximate meaning.

Below are a few examples from the book. As a note, the chapter and book numbers may be different across editions.

Within Book X, Chapter II: "How Sir Tristram saved Sir Palomides' life, and how they promised to fight together within a fortnight" (second-to-last sentence, first paragraph):

"Ye say well, said Sir Tristram, how I assign you to meet me in the meadow by the river of Camelot, where Merlin set the peron."

Note that it is being used as if it were an object, "the peron".

The title of a chapter:

Book X, Chapter V: "How Sir Tristram met at the Peron with Sir Launcelot, and how they fought together unknown."

Within the chapter mentioned above (first sentence, first paragraph):

"Then departed Sir Tristram and rode straight unto Camelot, to the peron that Merlin had made tofore, where Sir Lanceor that was the king's son of Ireland, was slain by the hands of Balin."


From searching into a possible definition, here are some definitions that don't quite fit:

  • From The Free Dictionary, referring to Juan Perón, former President of Argentinia, or his family;
  • Referring to Peronism or Peronists, an Argentinian political movement, based on the political ideology of Juan Perón;
  • Referring to the French word perron meaning "steps (to an entranceway)". I don't think Merlin could "set" steps (from the first quote).

Any hints towards the right definition would be helpful!

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    Peron, tombstone see. – MikeJRamsey56 Jun 15 '17 at 20:51
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    It's Fr peroun or perroun--a monumental or memorial stone, such as that in which the Sword which Arthur drew was set. – StoneyB on hiatus Jun 15 '17 at 20:52
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    And from context, it would be the stone of the tomb of Lanceor and Colombe: And by the craft of Merlin he made to inter this knight, Lanceor, and his lady, Colombe, under one stone. And at that time Merlin prophesied that in that same place should fight two the best knights that ever were in Arthur's days, and the best lovers. – Davo Jun 15 '17 at 20:56
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    @Davo I think you should expand your comment into an answer. It gives essential detail that mine does not. – ab2 Jun 15 '17 at 21:04
  • @ab2 Works fine for me. Which browser are you using? I use https everywhere. So try copying the url and replace https with http. – MikeJRamsey56 Jun 15 '17 at 21:31
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According to the Oxford English Dictionary, perron is:

  1. A large block or other stone structure, with or without steps, used as a platform, the base of a monument, market cross, etc. Now hist

The OED gives many examples, of which this is one:

a1470 Malory Morte Darthur (Winch. Coll.) 568 Trystram rode streyte to Camelot to the perowne that Merlyon had made tofore

The OED lists variant spellings

perron, n.

Forms: ME peron, ME peroun, ME perowne, ME apparoun

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Supplementing ab2's answer: from context, it would be the stone of the tomb of Lanceor and Colombe:

And by the craft of Merlin he made to inter this knight, Lanceor, and his lady, Colombe, under one stone. And at that time Merlin prophesied that in that same place should fight two the best knights that ever were in Arthur's days, and the best lovers.

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