0

Here's what the protagonist in a movie said (I'm typing what I heard, may or may not be grammatically correct): "Balls in your court".

In that phrase, the term 'balls' is shortened version of "Ball is..."

What I don't understand is that how do I write a grammatically correct sentence which has a shortened version of "Ball is in your court" that sounds like "Balls in your court"?

Is it "Ball's in your court" OR "Balls in your court" (as I mentioned above) OR is it something else?

I'm skeptical about "Ball's in your court" because that apostrophe would imply that it's about something related to the ball; it just feels out of place.

I hope the question is clear otherwise let me know. Thank you.

closed as off-topic by sumelic, choster, JEL, Peter K., RaceYouAnytime Jun 16 '17 at 4:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Apostrophes are also used to indicate contractions. – Jim Jun 14 '17 at 5:23
  • @Xanne Oh, I get it. You may consider posting that as an answer. I'll mark it answered. – Anoneemus Jun 14 '17 at 7:26
2

Ball's in your court.

's is used to mean 1. possession (or) is 2. short for is/has/does/us.

(Reference for the second meaning - google is. "it's raining" has. "she's gone" us. pronoun: 's "let's go" does. "what's he do?"

More examples: Apple's not good - Apple is not good Apple's quality is not good - The quality of apple is referred to here.

2

"Ball's in your court" is what you heard. It's short for "the ball is in your court" meaning that it's up to you to make the next move.

  • You can strengthen this answer by explaining that it is a contraction. – aparente001 Jun 16 '17 at 2:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.