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I want to write a sentence like

"There is routine work which Mr Robert is responsible for."

or in the form of non-essential clause

"There is a routine work, which Mr Robert is responsible for, that needs to start this Monday."

I'm not sure if these sentences are weird because when I Google then, there are only sentences with a form like

"Mr Robert is responsible for routine work."

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  • Unclear what you're asking. What do you want to know? Jun 11 '17 at 17:36
  • "Routine" might mean one of two different things here. Can you explain the idea you're trying to convey? Jun 12 '17 at 3:09
  • Sorry for my unclear question, at first, I just want to make sure that if it is weird to put "responsible for" in the sentence like first and second in question .
    – Carr
    Jun 12 '17 at 3:47
  • @aparente001, thank for your response! But I'm not clear about what " one of two different things here" means. Sorry for my poor english.
    – Carr
    Jun 12 '17 at 3:53
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The question, as clarified in a comment, is I just want to make sure that if it is weird to put "responsible for" in the sentence like first and second in question.

I will interpret the question to be: given this sentence

Mr Robert is responsible for X task.

where X is some task or job duty, for example proofreading all outgoing quotes, can the sentence be rewritten in the form

There is X task which Mr Robert is responsible for.

The answer is that yes, in principle you can do this, but "There is" is awkward. Here are two example sentence to give you a feel for the kind of construction you want to make:

Proofreading of all outgoing quotes is a task which Mr Robert is responsible for.

Proofreading of all outgoing quotes, which Mr Robert is responsible for, needs to be done in a more timely way, going forward.

If the question has more to do with how to use the word routine, then I would suggest a separate question. Also, SE has a wonderful site for English Language Learners which you might want to try.

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  • Very appreciate for your help!
    – Carr
    Jun 12 '17 at 23:54

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