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Whenever I google it the results are mostly about Romance languages. Google itself gives two versions r'omance and rom'ance.

Are they used interchangeably for both the noun and the verb or r'omance is the noun and rom'ance is the verb?

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    Both stress patterns occur in both the noun and verb usages, but personally I don't recall ever hearing adjectival the Romance languages stressed on the first syllable, and that version also seems less common for the verb form (which is in any case somewhat dated, so we wouldn't hear either version very often these days). – FumbleFingers Jun 8 '17 at 14:43
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    As a linguist, I have probably heard and said the phrase Romance language(s) more often than most English speakers, and I have heard it both ways. Personally, I wouldn't stress it on the first syllable unless I was contrasting the language(s) with others, though. – John Lawler Jun 8 '17 at 14:50
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    @John Lawler: On reflection, it wouldn't sound particularly strange to me to hear someone contrast Ger'manic and 'Romance languages. Perhaps because that specific contrast wouldn't sound so clear-cut if both terms had the same stressed syllable, and were only distinguished by their unstressed components. But maybe I'm just overthinking things there. – FumbleFingers Jun 8 '17 at 16:26
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The word "romance", whether used as a noun or as a verb, can be stressed on either the first or the second syllable.

The Oxford English Dictionary gives the following explanation of the position of the stress in the noun or adjective "Romance/romance":

Metrical evidence suggests that the position of the main stress has been variable from an early date. For modern evidence of stress on the first syllable compare:

  • 1921 H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 2) vii. 209 The chief movement in American..would seem to be toward throwing the accent upon the first syllable... I might add..defect, excess, address, magazine, decoy and romance.
  • 1939 N. Monsarrat This is Schoolroom xvii. 385 The dance-band world..has given us a new pronunciation—‘bokay’ for bouquet, ‘rómance’ thus accented.
  • 1966 C. Mackenzie My Life & Times V. 193 The cinema audience wants rómance. We must give them rómance.
  • 1971 J. Fleming Grim Death vii. 87 It's the end of ro-mance, is marriage.

In British English pronunciations with stress on the first syllable occur mainly in the senses at branch A. I. ["As a literary genre, and derived senses"], especially A. 5 ["The character or quality that makes something appeal strongly to the imagination..."], A. 6 ["A love affair; a romantic relationship"], and A. 7 ["A story of romantic love..."], but probably less commonly than pronunciations with stress on the second syllable.

This supports what was said in the first comment beneath your question:

Both stress patterns occur in both the noun and verb usages, but personally I don't recall ever hearing adjectival the Romance languages stressed on the first syllable, and that version also seems less common for the verb form (which is in any case somewhat dated, so we wouldn't hear either version very often these days). – FumbleFingers

The OED entry for the verb "romance" shows both stress patterns as existing in both British and American English. It contains little information about the history of the pronunciation, only the note "N.E.D. (1909) gives only the pronunciation (romæ·ns) /rəʊˈmæns/."

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