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If I were to use one of the sentences below in a book, which one would be grammatically correct?

  • This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad; one of which has passed on and the other is deployed.

    or:

  • This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad; one of them has passed on and the other is deployed.

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      "One of whom ..." would be the correct relative clause. What a strange sentence, especially your seemingly infelicitous use of the word "deployed"! What does it mean? – BillJ Jun 7 '17 at 19:32
    • Deployed = sent on assignment by the military? – Xanne Jun 7 '17 at 22:26
    • @BillJ - Xanne is correct. Common term in the U.S. Did you by any chance try a dictionary? – aparente001 Jun 8 '17 at 5:47
    • @aparente001 Now don't be silly. I meant what does the sentence mean. – BillJ Jun 8 '17 at 6:12
    • @BillJ - For example, MacMillan (dictionary.com/browse/deploy) gives an example sentence: In 2001 Landsberry reenlisted into the Nevada Air National Guard and went on to deploy three times, most recently to Afghanistan. Maybe you speak UK English, and this word isn't used this way there? – aparente001 Jun 9 '17 at 4:58
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    I think either could work. I'd go with the top - which should actually be "one of whom" - but would change it to read as follows instead:

    • This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad; one who has passed on and the other is deployed.

    or:

    • This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad; one has passed on and the other is deployed.
    • You could clean this answer up nicely by going with your "one of whom" idea. – aparente001 Jun 8 '17 at 5:46
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    The thing you need is "one of whom." Not too hard to arrange if we speak of just one person:

    This made her think of her grandparents, one of whom has passed on.

    But it's tricky to talk about both people. Let's try this:

    This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad, one of whom was deceased and the other, deployed.

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