2

I have a laptop in which software is installed by which I check a particular notification. So I am saying I will check the notification from my system and that notification is sent to me by someone.

I am a bit confused that how to use the sentence correctly below.

A. the notification number which you send I will check in my laptop tomorrow.
B. I will check the notification number which you send in my laptop

Does the word order make a difference to the meaning?

  • Bill the meaning of you sentence is different and my different because I have a laptop in which a software installed through which I check the notification. So I am telling I will check the notification from my system and the notification sent to me by someone. – Hussain Jun 2 '17 at 6:49
  • My hunch is I will check on my laptop the notification number that you have sent. Or, more formally, I will check on my laptop the notification number which you have sent. I don't have time to check this right now but perhaps, if that's the meaning that Hussain means to get across, someone else can come support it with real evidence. – CalendarJ Aug 7 '17 at 0:27
  • The first part of your question says that you check notifications, but your example sentences say that you check notification numbers. Should I assume that the notifications are merely numbers? Or (as seems more likely) are the numbers merely pointers by means of which you access the actual notifications? – Andreas Blass Aug 4 '18 at 0:13
1

"I will verify the notification number when I get on my laptop tomorrow." (In place of "verify" you might use some other term, depending on what you mean by "check'. And you might prefer to use "sign on to" instead of "get on".)

The notification number which you send I will check in my laptop tomorrow.

This is understandable but not particularly idiomatic.

I will check the notification number which you send in my laptop.

This is confusing. On first scan it sounds like he's sending you your laptop.

0

It might be easier to address the sender directly:

"Send the notification number to my laptop and I will check it tomorrow."

If you want to make the sentence conditional, start it with "If".
If you want to make it a request, start it with "Please".

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There is a difference in meaning. In sentence A it is clear that a notification number is being sent, and the receiver will verify it in his laptop. In sentence B it is possible to interpret "the notification number which you send in my laptop" as a message which is sent within the receiver's laptop. In both sentences the relative pronoun should be "that" and not "which," so as to indicate a restriction of the notification number.

A. the notification number which you send I will check in my laptop tomorrow. B. I will check the notification number which you send in my laptop

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A) This sentences doesn't seem to be correct to me.

You can write : " The notification number which you send will be checked in my laptop by me tomorrow. " But it doesn't sound good to me too.

B) This sounds good. But don't use comma before "which " here unless you count it [ which you send] as nonessential.

  • Shall I say that I will check the notification number which you send in my laptop. – Hussain Jul 7 '17 at 21:11

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