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What do you call the person who is in charge of the vehicles within a company?

closed as unclear what you're asking by choster, Spagirl, curiousdannii, Scott, CJM Jun 7 '17 at 12:18

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    Motor Pool Sergeant – Hot Licks May 31 '17 at 16:20
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    Welcome to EL&U. Can you edit your post to explain what kind of vehicles you have in mind, and what you mean by in charge? An airline may use different terminology from a bicycle courier service, and dispatcher is in charge of vehicles in a different sense from how a director or administrator is in charge of them. – choster May 31 '17 at 21:22
  • Also, the answer to this kind of question may well vary from one country to another as well as from one industry to another. (I think in the UK "car pool" is much more common than "motor pool"). – Michael Kay Jun 2 '17 at 8:10
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    @MichaelKay Just keep in mind that "car pool" means something completely different in the US. – R.M. Jun 2 '17 at 15:02
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Fleet manager.

This is the person who is in charge of the vehicles within a company.

Ref e.g.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleet_management

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Just to resolve the two answers:

If the business revolves around transportation, its vehicles collectively are its fleet. A trucking company has a fleet, an airline has a fleet, a rental-car or taxi company has a fleet, a navy, of course, has a fleet.

If the business needs transportation as an ordinary part of its business and so maintains a few vehicles for its own use, they are its motor pool.

(Question for the class: does the Post Office have a fleet or a pool? My own guess it that it's called a fleet, because its integral to the business.)

Unsurprisingly, the manager of a fleet or motor pool is the fleet manager or motor-pool manager. Many military installations have motor pools, and their supervisor is referred to by rank, typically "motor-pool sergeant".

Incidentally, the parts of the military that revolve around transportation but are not navies do not say "fleet". The air-force has "wings" (something of a pun, since the usage is really derived from the wing of a building, but suggests the wing of a plane); and armored units have "columns", platoon, and companies.

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The vehicles of a company are often referred to as a fleet.

Funnily enough, Googling "fleet" gave me results for people who manage company cars as the top two results.

A number of vehicles or aircraft operating together or under the same ownership.
‘a fleet of ambulances took the injured to hospital’

Therefore, I would call the person who is in charge the fleet manager. This is the case for our company, and we're not even in an English speaking country.

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Another phrase used for a the vehicles belonging to an organization is the motor pool. This usually has the connotation of a fleet of vehicles that do not "belong" to a particular worker but are instead assigned to various employees as necessary to complete their tasks. Someone who is in charge of such a group of vehicles would therefore be a motor pool manager or a motor pool supervisor.

Example (PDF):

The following information will be helpful to you in securing a vehicle from the Kentucky State University Motor Pool:

1) Call the Motor Pool Manager (Calvin Clark) at xxx-xxxx and request the type of vehicle needed, at least two weeks in advance of trip.

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    I wonder if Calvin Clark is the daytime name of Calvin Klein’s superhero alter ego… – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 31 '17 at 21:32
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The other posters aren't wrong. Fleet or motor pool manager is going to be a good midlevel title. I'll just note that a larger corporation might also have a vice president of fleet operations, logistics, transport, or transportation services who would oversee the local fleet managers and their car pools.

On the other side, you might have a smaller company where the person in charge of the vehicles within the company is called Ed.

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    Obviously the person in charge of the cars must be called Carl. Ed would be the head of education. – J_F_B_M Jun 2 '17 at 12:56

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