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She’s in love with Claudio, the brave soldier, home from the war.

What is the role of "home from the war" here? I know the meaning of the whole sentence, but I couldn't understand the structure and grammar. What can we grammatically call the phrase "home from the war" here?

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  • I know the meaning of the whole sentence. but I couldn't understand the structure and grammar
    – hnaseri
    May 30 '17 at 20:50
  • In English (and, I imagine, in many other languages), speakers and writers often omit words that, through familiarity with syntactical patterns, their hearers or readers will readily recognize as being implied by the wording that does appear. In this case, I would immediately understand the speaker to mean "She’s in love with Claudio, the brave soldier, who is home from the war." In his answer, Roger Sinasohn understands the missing words slightly differently: "She’s in love with Claudio, the brave soldier, who has come home from the war." But effectively, they mean the same thing.
    – Sven Yargs
    Jun 3 '17 at 18:25
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The phrase home from the war describes Claudio, the brave soldier. Consider it this way:

She’s in love with Claudio [who has come] home from the war.

I dropped out the brave soldier so it wouldn't distract from the meaning (it's just more description of Claudio) and added the implied who has come to make the last bit's meaning clearer.

Hope that helps!

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  • Thank you very much for your answer. So what can we grammatically call the phrase "home from the war" here. And how do we know that we can eliminate [who has come] here?
    – hnaseri
    May 30 '17 at 20:56
  • Home from the war is an adjective phrase -- it describes Claudio. As for how we know we can get rid of who has come, well, clearly it was perhaps needed more than the author thought -- otherwise, you wouldn't have asked your question. But, as an author, one has a lot of leeway as to how one writes things -- it's called poetic license. Apparently the author thought it wasn't necessary and that it sounded better without it. May 30 '17 at 21:17
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She’s in love with Claudio, the brave soldier, home from the war.

Both the brave soldier and home from the war describe Claudio. They are adjective phrases, both modifying the (proper) noun, Claudio.

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