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What is a better way to say "and again" when you are repeating instructions to someone?

When you just went over how to process something and the client doesn't seem to get it. You start to tell them again and lead in by saying " and again...." It seems harsh like you are shutting the other person down. I'm looking for a softer way to do this.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Edwin Ashworth, choster, Hellion, FumbleFingers, Roaring Fish Jun 4 '17 at 15:19

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  • I don't understand the question--in what sort of context would and again be discourteous? – StoneyB May 30 '17 at 18:35
  • Can you provide an example using and again? – Roger Sinasohn May 30 '17 at 18:40
  • When you just went over how to process something and the client doesn't seem to get it. You start to tell them again and lead in by saying " and again...." It seems harsh like you are shutting the other person down. I'm looking for a softer way to do this. – Cheryl May 30 '17 at 18:51
  • Just don’t say, “And again...” just politely and patiently answer the question. Saying anything like “and again” serves only to vent your frustration and sarcastically point out that they should have been paying attention. If you are trying to be polite you maintain patience, bite your tongue and pretend nothing is wrong – Jim May 30 '17 at 19:17
  • Some day you will want to express the impatience (hopefully not with a client, though). "And again" isn't how this is done in English. It's "As I said...." // Great answer from Roger. // Please give English Language Learners SE a try. Great site. // I agree with you -- I don't like it when people say, "As I said...." – aparente001 May 31 '17 at 4:42
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If you're repeating the instructions because the other person wasn't paying attention or tried and screwed up for not following the directions, here are some options:

As I said previously...
To be clear...

If you want to repeat the instructions to make sure they understood them, you could say:

That is, [instructions said a different way]
Let me put that another way: [instructions said a different way]

If you really want to avoid offense, you can put the blame on yourself:

In case I misspoke previously, let me go over it again...
I might have said that wrong, let me try again...

More context would help us give better options.

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    I would start by assuming I did not explain it well the first time and always use different words the second time. Any form of 'and again' says that it was you who missed the boat. – Yosef Baskin May 30 '17 at 20:53

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