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To "Query" is the primary method to extract information from a database. A "quarry" is the place where minerals are extracted from the ground. I'm curious if these share similar etymology as they both have very similar sounds and very similar uses?

Thanks.

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  • @StoneyB I didn't see your comment before I posted. Sorry about that. – MikeJRamsey56 May 26 '17 at 20:57
  • @MikeJRamsey56 There's no need to apologize for doing the actual work I skipped. :) – StoneyB on hiatus May 26 '17 at 21:00
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I will refer you to the Online Etymology Dictionary.

query from Latin quaere "ask,". Spelling altered c. 1600 by influence of inquiry.

quarry from Medieval Latin quareia, dissimilated from quarreria (mid-13c.), literally "place where stones are squared," from Latin quadrare "to make square,".

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No there is no etymological link between the two terms despite their assonance. They both come from Latin:

query (n.) :

  • 1530s, quaere "a question," from Latin quaere "ask," imperative of quaerere "to seek, look for; strive, endeavor, strive to gain; ask, require, demand;" figuratively "seek mentally, seek to learn, make inquiry," probably ultimately from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns. Spelling Englished or altered c. 1600 by influence of inquiry.

quarry (n.2) :

  • Borrowing from Medieval Latin quarreria (1266), literally a "place where stones are squared", from Old French quarrière (compare modern French carrière), from Vulgar Latin *quadraria, from Latin quadrō (“I square”) itself from quadra (“a square”).

  • "open place where rocks are excavated," c. 1400 (mid-13c. as a place name), from Medieval Latin quareia, dissimilated from quarreria (mid-13c.), literally "place where stones are squared," from Latin quadrare "to make square," related to quadrus "a square," quattuor "four"

(Etymonline)

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