3

Here has some examples:

... inet_connection_sock.c in the Linux kernel through 4.10.15 allows attackers to ...

... Linux kernel 3.12 through 3.15 ...

... io_ti.c in the Linux kernel before 4.10.4 allows local users to ...

What does "through/before" mean here?

  1. Does 'through 4.10.15' mean all version before 4.10.15, including '4.9.0 - 4.9.27(without 4.9.28+)', '4.8.0 - 4.8.17' and so on?
  2. Does '3.12 through 3.15' mean all of '3.12.0 - 3.15.10'?
  3. Does 'before 4.10.4' mean '4.10.0 - 4.10.4' without 4.9.* or another main version?
  • 6
    "X Through Y" means starting with version X, all versions until (and including) Y. "Through Y" (with no X) means all versions until (and including) Y. "Before Y" means all versions until (but not including) Y. Of course these are all tempered with an implicit "from the version where this code first appeared". – Hellion May 25 '17 at 2:06
4

There is a little difference between them:

For example,

  • through 4.10.15: versions before 4.10.15 and version 4.10.15
  • before 4.10.15: versions before 4.10.15

The meaning of "before" is usually in terms of numerical order. However, it is advisable to read the Linux kernel versioning

  • 2
    In British English, inclusive is used: "Answer questions 8 to 12 inclusive." In North American English, through is used: "Answer questions 8 through 12." – truongminh Sep 16 '17 at 15:58

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