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People often tend to over use the word "like", as in 'as', mostly in conversations and sometimes in writings. So what part of the grammar rule or effective language usage principle states that the repeated use will weaken a certain writing?

Example:

"...you know, its like, having this feeling that you know you are right, but you feel like you might be wrong."

closed as primarily opinion-based by NVZ, Cascabel, choster, Laure, David May 27 '17 at 20:04

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Can you give an example? "Like" has several different roles and I'm not sure which one(s) you're talking about. – Laurel May 23 '17 at 19:40
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    Your edit suggests the misuse of "like" in place of the conjunction "as". Is that what you mean? As in "like I said" rather than "as I said"...? – Cascabel May 23 '17 at 19:47
  • @Cascabel Example; "...you know, its like, having this feeling that you know you are right, but you feel like you might be wrong." It might suggest a misuse of the word but not quite what I meant. – Sallyz May 23 '17 at 19:56
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    It's not overuse of like and as, it's over use of like as an interjection. Just put in uh instead of like. Same idea. But like has taken over the landscape with young people. But that has zero to do with using like to compare something to something. – Lambie May 23 '17 at 20:01
  • Actually, I'll give many uses of "like" as an interjection a little more credit. It is more of a contraction of "It was like this. I was driving down the street adjusting the radio and I who do I see but Matt Daemon". It emphasizes a emphasized request for the listener to imagine something. "Picture this." or "So you see" are similar but a bit stilted. Adults use "so" by itself. "So, I was driving down the street and what do ..." At any rate is is more than an "uh". I do believe it expresses something even in places where it grates for many people. – Tom22 May 23 '17 at 20:40

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