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Working out, riding my bike, yoga and a good massage was all that I needed today.

Or should I use "were" instead of "was"?

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    It depends on whether you are referring to the gestalt or to the separate things.
    – Lawrence
    May 19 '17 at 15:21
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    Was is fine. Grammatically, it means that all these activities are considered as a single (e.g., singular) "entity" (or as a single set); were works if you consider all the activities as being plural in nature. You have that flexibility in English. Just as you can use either the singular or plural with collective nouns such as team, committee and majority depending on how you conceive each entity. Use the plural when you consider the members of such entities as individual units doing their own thing; use the singular when you conceive of the entity as acting as a single body. May 19 '17 at 15:25
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    In general a coordination of NPs, or a mixture of NPs and other expressions, linked by "and" takes a plural verb. It doesn't matter whether the individual coordinates are singular or plural: the coordination as a whole denotes a set containing at least two members , and hence takes a plural verb : "were". (note: the coordinates in your example should not be conceptualised as a single activity.)
    – BillJ
    May 19 '17 at 15:31
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Was is fine. Grammatically, it means that all these activities are considered as a single "entity", as a single set of activities. Were works if you consider all the activities as being individual in nature, and not being part of a single set. You have that flexibility in English. Just as you can use either the singular or plural with collective nouns such as team, committee and majority depending on how you conceive each entity. Use the plural when you consider the members of such entities as individual units doing their own thing; use the singular when you conceive of the entity as acting as a single body.

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    Just because they're all fitness related doesn't mean they're a single entity like "bacon and eggs". It looks as though you've made the verb agree with the final coordinate which is singular.
    – BillJ
    May 19 '17 at 18:57

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