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Every morning the princess wakes up and kisses the frog; hoping to see it turn into a prince.

Is the above construction wrong?

From Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck:

His huge companion dropped his blankets and flung himself down and drank from the surface of the green pool; drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse.

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    The semi-colon should be replaced by a comma there. – aparente001 May 19 '17 at 6:14
  • Is this within the purview of the site? I ask less to close and more to know for myself. I believe punctuation is here considered style rather than grammar. Yes? – Unrelated Oct 5 '17 at 19:09
  • One can argue that he drank is ellided from the second clause, so it could be considered correct. Even if someone rejected this explanation, punctuation is often times a matter of style, and punctuation usage, as does style, comes and goes. – Arm the good guys in America Oct 5 '17 at 22:16
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    @Unrelated I was randomly reading some Q & A's on ELU when I stumbled upon this interesting comment : 'In summary, don't look to novels to follow grammar and punctuation rules precisely; the priority in popular literature is more on style than perfection.' So I think yes? Link – peerless Oct 6 '17 at 6:33
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    Are artists bound to "rules"? Sculptors? Composers? If not, then why writers? – Arm the good guys in America Oct 6 '17 at 9:44
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A semicolon is most commonly used to link (in a single sentence) two independent clauses that are closely related in thought. e.g: Some people write with a word processor; others write with a pen or pencil.

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Yes, a non-finite clause can follow a semicolon. A semicolon is used to separate independent clauses, each of which could stand alone. The example of the question,

Every morning the princess wakes up and kisses the frog, hoping to see it turn into a prince.

requires a comma, since it has just one independent clause. But we could have instead an expression where the dependent clause is part of a following independent clause:

Every morning the princess wakes up and kisses the frog; hoping to see it turn into a prince, she tilts her head to receive a return of her kiss.

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