1

Popped out? Sprung out? I can't find the correct word.

Example sentence:

She tucked a strand of her chin-length hair behind her ear, only to __ again.

3
  • only for it to pop out again -- works for me. May 19, 2017 at 4:27
  • ... only for it to spring back...., if her hair's curly, sounds good to me.
    – Mari-Lou A
    May 19, 2017 at 18:31
  • Wait..what's the word for probably the more likely situation, which is for it to move of of its original position?
    – Mitch
    May 19, 2017 at 19:52

4 Answers 4

2

She tucked a lock of her chin-length hair behind her ear, only for it to flop again.

Oxford Living Dictionaries gives this definition of the verb

flop
[with adverbial] Fall, move, or hang in a loose and ungainly way.

  • ‘his blond hair flopped over his eyes’
  • ‘Some of his dark hair flopped onto his forehead and I almost reached out to tuck it back into place.’
0

I'm not sure if there's a special word, but "fall out" would be one of the most natural ways. Definitely not pop or sprung though.

One thing though; I would change the phrasing slightly and say:

...only for it to fall out again.

3
  • Thumbs down. Hair falling out generally means it's getting detached from your head. May 19, 2017 at 4:26
  • @aparente001 No - context matters. Just saying your hair falls out of course implies that you lose it, but in this sentence and as I phrased it ("only for it to fall out again") would be an appropriate usage and understood as intended May 19, 2017 at 10:37
  • I would agree with you if the sentence went like this: She tucked a stray strand of hair back into the bun at the back of her head, only for it to fall out again. But to me, "She tucked a strand of her chin-length hair behind her ear, only for it to fall out again" sounds weird. Fall out of what? I suppose, since the hair was only pushed behind the ear, it could fall forward. Jun 16, 2017 at 3:45
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Depending on how poetic you want to be, you could say:

She tucked a strand of her chin-length hair behind her ear, only to have it emerge again.

(Or you could use @BennyLewis' phrasing and go with ...only for it to emerge again.)

Less poetic would be:

...only for it to come loose again.

Any which way, hair is a pain. (says the guy who hasn't had a haircut in 7 or 8 years.)

0

You do your hair (into a hairdo) by arranging it. When it becomes disarranged, we can say it comes (or becomes) undone.

She tucked a strand of her chin-length hair behind her ear, only to come undone again.

Do can mean to set or style the hair or makeup. (The Free Dictionary #6). A couple of years ago, the undone look became a fashionable way to style one's hair and dress.

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