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In my essay, I need to write many phrases similar to "under A than under B", which appears to be a bit too verbose after a while due to the many under's. I am wondering if it is grammatically incorrect to omit the "under" after "than" or informal to do so.

So,

It performs better under circumstance A than circumstance B.

Or,

...than under circumstance B.

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  • Technically, the first case is ambiguous and could be interpreted as meaning "It performs better under circumstance A than circumstance B performs under circumstance A.", and someone being "humorous" or pedantic might point that out. But in normal speech, people typically don't bother including the second "under".
    – fixer1234
    May 18 '17 at 22:26
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Your first suggestion IS gramatically correct, "It performs better under circumstance A than B. To add variety, you may also choose to say thing like, "When tested under circumstances A and B, A gave better results" or "...A performed at a higher level." Whatever works for your specific situation.

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