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I want to know more about this grammar.

-And now, just a few days before the presidential election, one of the most frequently appearing election terms is the "underdog effect."

I think this sentence can be changed to "one of the most election terms that appeared frequently" (I am not sure but I tried)

so, I think NOUN THAT VERB ADVERB ---> CHANGE ---> ADVERB VERB+ING NOUN

IS it correct?

If so, could you give me some examples of this?

  • Your formula does not quite hold together. Try "one election term that is appearing most frequently is the underdog effect." Or, "one election term, the underdog effect, is appearing most frequently." – Yosef Baskin May 18 '17 at 15:23
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Your example sentence is more complicated than your description, because the phrase "frequently appearing" is modifying the noun phrase "election terms", so it is an [ADVERB + VERB] acting as an adjective. I'm not sure what to call that—I don't think it's an adjective phrase because it doesn't contain an adjective, but maybe attributive adjectival phrase would do.

In any case, the true ADVERB in your example is most. To ask the question posed in your title, we can substitute the word confusing for the two words frequently occurring, which gives us a true ADVERB + ADJECTIVE + NOUN set:

one of the most confusing election terms is the "underdog effect."

If we want to rewrite this using "that", we would say

one of the election terms that is most confusing is the "underdog effect."

which is NOUN + that is + ADVERB + ADJECTIVE

Going back to your original example, the adjectival phrase consisting of [ADVERB + VERB] needs a bit more inversion to be completely idiomatic. So

one of the most frequently appearing election terms is the "underdog effect."

could possibly be written as

one of the election terms that is most-frequently-appearing is the "underdog effect."

However, it would sound most correct to say

one of the election terms that is appearing most frequently is the "underdog effect."

Thus ADVERB + [ADVERB + VERB] + NOUN becomes NOUN + that is + VERB + ADVERB + ADVERB.

  • Thank you for your comment! I sincerely appreciate it :) – Han May 19 '17 at 2:51
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You should say "more frequently". Something can be "most frequently" but not "one of the most".

  • This is wrong. One of the most frequently occurring is one of the most frequently occurring usages. – Chenmunka May 19 '17 at 8:01

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