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I'm not sure if the following sentence makes sense:

"I first spend a couple of minutes to briefly overview  the history of analysis techniques to build the stage to introduce our new technique "

I mean that I first explain about the history of analysis techniques and in this way I will make your minds really to introduce my own new technique.

Does it make sense?

what can be a better sentence?

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    Try set the stage for introducing our new technique. – Jim May 18 '17 at 14:56
  • When you say you will "briefly overview the history," overview is not a verb and I expect it will not be brief. Also, a brief overview is a summary, so "summarizing the history" is easier to understand. While you are right to set the stage, you don't have to say so. Your overview will do it for you. – Yosef Baskin May 18 '17 at 20:46
  • Note that setting the stage means preparing or educating your listener to absorb your message, but not really "to prepare all the requirements.” – Yosef Baskin May 18 '17 at 21:06
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You are very close to a common expression, which is to "set the stage". Use that instead of "build the stage", and it will sound much more natural. It is used in the figurative sense (not preparing an actual stage) to describe general preparation for a specific purpose.

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I would write "I first spend a couple of minutes to briefly overview the history of analysis techniques to introduce our new technique." If you simply cannot remove the stage bit, try "I first spend a couple of minutes to briefly overview the history of analysis techniques to build the stage for the introduction of our new technique." By the way, the more common term is "set the stage", which originally meant bring what is needed for the scene onto the stage. A carpenter would be needed to build a stage.

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