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In the Lesson 24, 'A skeleton in the cupboard', there is a question in the Structure section.

The question is:

The only person I have ever known ___ a skeleton in the cupboard is George Carlton.

a) he had
b) of having
c) that he has
d) to have

The only relevant content is 'The only person I know who has a skeleton in the cupboard is George Carlton, and he is very proud of the fact.'

There's no explanation about the answer. I think:

a) Wrong. There will be two subjects, 'the only person' 'he'. This is a typical error in writing.
b) I don't understand it. The word 'of' seems unnecessary here.
c) It's a that-clause and modifies 'person'. However, 'he' makes the clause fail to meet the purpose.
d) The only expression I could recall is "be known to do sth." But there's no 'be' in this opinion.

The answer is d) to have.

I don't get it. Why d is the right choice? Please explain this to me.

  • 1
    What concept is the lesson supposed to teach you, and have you tried to figure out why the others are wrong? – Xanne May 18 '17 at 5:03
  • Thanks for your kind reminding. The only relevant content is 'The only person I know who has a skeleton in the cupboard is George Carlton, and he is very proud of the fact.' There's no explanation about the answer. I think: a) Wrong. There will be two subjects, 'the only person' 'he'. This is a typical error in writing. b) I don't understand it. The word 'of' seems unnecessary here. c) It's a that-clause and modifies 'person'. However, 'he' makes the clause fail to meet the purpose. d) The only expression I could recall is "be known to do sth." But there's no 'be' in this opinion. @Xanne – Irene Liu May 19 '17 at 2:20
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You mention a reference sentence:

The only person I know who has a skeleton in the cupboard is George Carlton, and he is very proud of the fact.

That sentence provides the basic meaning of the sentence and then the lesson involves modifying some of the words a little. So start with that reference sentence (and leave off the extra bit at the end that isn't included in the lesson sentence).

If you leave out the middle of the sentence, the sentence would just directly identify George Carlton:

The only person ... is George Carlton.

The way the original and lesson sentences differ from that is that they don't directly identify him. Instead, they describes a "theoretical" kind of person:

The only person I know who has a skeleton in the cupboard...

and then offer George Carlton as an example of such a person.

So within the portion of the sentence where you need to fill in the blank, you aren't talking about George Carlton, who hasn't been introduced yet. You are referring to a theoretical person. Selections a and c can't be right because they refer to "he" and nothing has established yet who "he" refers to. For that matter, the theoretical person doesn't even have a specific gender.

Look at the part of the reference sentence the lesson asks you to modify:

The only person I know who has a skeleton...
vs.
The only person I have ever known ___ a skeleton...

and you're down to a choice of:

b) of having
d) to have

You can be known for having something or known to have something, but you can't be known of having something. That's why d is the answer.

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