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If you choose to leave a store/restaurant, you say they lost your business/service. How would you say the same for employment? Take, for instance:

The interview went great, yet they still did not hire me. I guess they lost my _______.

Would employeeship or employment be correct? Both of them sound rather odd in this context.

  • You could say "employment." I can't think of anything better than that. I would not say "employeeship" because that term is not a common term in English and is at best a neologism meaning something completely different. – RaceYouAnytime May 16 '17 at 3:13
  • If they thought not having you as an employee would be loss, they would have hired you. Therefore it’s not a loss of anything to them. – Jim May 16 '17 at 3:20
  • contributions, potential contribution – Tom22 May 16 '17 at 3:47
  • I think a better parallel to loss of custom would be something like The company lost my ___ due to their toxic work environment and sub-standard compensation. I actually think one of the words you suggested, service, makes more sense for employees than customers. – 1006a May 16 '17 at 5:29
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If you choose to leave a store/restaurant, you say they lost your business/service.

In this example you have presented, you are referring to something you were offering them, which they lost out on. They could have had your business/service but they did not because you left.

So you need a word which describes the object/quality the employer has lost by not employing you.

The interview went great, yet they still did not hire me. I guess they lost my talent.

However because they never had your talent in the first place I would adjust slightly to:

The interview went great, yet they still did not hire me. I guess they lost out on my talent.

Talent is a word frequently used in this context, take this plethora of examples, courtesy of Merriam-Webster:

Talent

She has a job that makes the most of her talents.

His experience, skills, and talents make him perfectly suited for the job.

There are many good players on the team, but she's a special talent.

The company has hired some expensive legal talent for the trial.

The team has recruited some of the best talent around.

The company is doing a talent search to find the right person for the job.

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"The interview went great, yet they still didn't hire me. I guess they lost [confidence in] my" ability/potential to be an employee.

I have gone beyond the OP by editing the original syntax and then adding ability/potential to be an employee. I hope that my syntactic suggestion is acceptable.

  • That's strange. I have attempted and failed to edit my answer by correcting my misspelling "poetntial" [sic]. – Peter Point May 16 '17 at 6:09
  • I took care of it. – Tushar Raj May 16 '17 at 6:13

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