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I was wondering if I can use "More concrete,..." at the beginning of a sentence in order to specify a general statement.

So for instance:

The company does not really perform well.
More concrete, the market share of the company dropped by 30%.

Is there another term that I can use instead or is it fine to use it?

  • The first sentence would sound more natural (especially with the second) written as "The company has not performed well." – Evan May 15 '17 at 14:19
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You could write it like this:

The company does not really perform well.

To put it more concretely, the market share of the company dropped by 30%.

"Concretely" is an adverb modifying "put." You could omit "To put it" if you wanted.

  • "Specifically" is another way to call attention to detail. – Xanne May 15 '17 at 14:27
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Whilst valid, I can't recall having seen "concrete" used in this way.

If the drop in market share is the only thing that makes you say the company doesn't perform well, you could say:

Specifically, the market share of the company dropped by 30%.

If the market share is just one instance of poor performance among many, you could say:

For example, the market share of the company dropped by 30%.

Both offer concrete evidence of your initial statement, but don't use the word itself.

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