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I am searching for a spicy, intriguing way to shorten "resurrects from the dead" which is the beginning of a logline:

“When her father resurrects from the dead…”

The following two sites give some options, but not the one I search for

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus-category/british/coming-back-to-life-again

http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/return%20to%20life

Resurrects seems the most obvious.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/resurrected

Would it also apply to a story in which something hits a city? Part of the population dies only for a couple of minutes and reawakens as human zombies, unable to hear or speak, but still able to feel the pain.

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    Awakens from the dead, rises from his deathbed, returns from the grave, reawakens (as you yourself said)--usually "resurrects" is transitive, e.g., "they were resurrected", X resurrected Y; brings back from the grave (Please fix the title) – Xanne May 15 '17 at 7:37
  • 'resurrects from the dead' would surely be tautological, as you can't resurrect from any other state? Therefore 'is resurrected' would be shorter, if not spicier. – Spagirl May 15 '17 at 19:36
  • @Spagirl Thanks for all your input. I am still wrestling to find the right angle. I think I might go with “When her loving father resurrects as a border-zombie… – Syk May 17 '17 at 7:58
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“When her father resurrects from the dead…”

I am searching for a spicy, intriguing way to shorten "resurrects from the dead.

How about:

When her father awakes from the dead...

or

When her father rises again...

or

When her father comes back to life...

Regarding the second question:

Would it also apply to a story in which something hits a city? [they]... reawaken as human zombies, unable to hear or speak, but still able to feel the pain.

Resurrect could be used here. As the word simply means to raise from the dead, as you have cited; however, you might want to add more additional meaning, if you wanted to make it clear that they were raised from the dead as zombies, and not their original relatively unaltered selves.

For example:

When her zombie reincarnated father arose...

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  • Also "came back to life". – Xanne May 15 '17 at 7:45
  • @Gary Thanks for all your effort. I like the “When her zombie reincarnated father.” What if I switch it into: “When her border-zombie father returns from the dead…” They look like part-time zombies but do not behave like ones, and through the story, they slowly get their human traits back (memory, behavior, looks… all, except the ability to speak and hear). – Syk May 16 '17 at 5:19
  • What if I switch it into: “When her border-zombie father returns from the dead…” Or maybe: “When her father resurrects as a border-zombie…” – Syk May 16 '17 at 5:44
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"When her dead father is reanimated."

reanimate

verb (used with object), reanimated, reanimating.

  1. to restore to life; resuscitate.
  2. to give fresh vigor, spirit, or courage to.
  3. to stimulate to renewed activity.

[dictionary.com]

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But only returns to life partially, her father, not a father anymore but a zombie or you can use the term "reinstituted" as her father reinstituted as a zombie

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  • Thanks for all your input. I am still wrestling to find the right angle. It is a logline, so it has to be in only a couple of words. I think I might go with “When her loving father resurrects as a border-zombie…" – Syk May 17 '17 at 7:59

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